“BTS member Jungkook tops Google's Most Searched K Pop Idols Worldwide in the first half of 2020 - PINKVILLA” plus 3 more

“BTS member Jungkook tops Google's Most Searched K Pop Idols Worldwide in the first half of 2020 - PINKVILLA” plus 3 more


BTS member Jungkook tops Google's Most Searched K Pop Idols Worldwide in the first half of 2020 - PINKVILLA

Posted: 06 Aug 2020 04:46 AM PDT

BTS member Jungkook was the most searched K-pop idol worldwide on Google in the first half of 2020 followed by V and Jimin. All the members of BTS found a spot in the Top 10.

2020 may not have been kind to the globe but if you're a fan of BTS then you've been blessed. Even when the septet was on quarantine mode, they never stopped working and instead churned out more content than we thought possible. In 2020 alone, they've given ARMY two albums with another one on the way, Break The Silence, the Bang Bang Con concert series and the upcoming variety show In the SOOP BTS ver. Oh, did we mention their elaborate celebrations for their seventh anniversary back in June with FESTA?!

Moreover, individually too, each member has been making the headlines for their achievements with their solo songs and as a part of BTS. Hence, it comes as no surprise that all members made it to the Top 10 of Google's Most Searched K-Pop Idols Worldwide (2020 Mid-Year Chart). Via Allkpop, topping the list is none other than Jungkook with a search index of 628.57. Following Kookie are V and Jimin in the second and third position with a search index of 590.91 and 450.00 respectively. Next up, we have Suga who claimed the fourth spot with a search index of 375.00. Breaking the BTS spell is IU who rounded up the Top 5 with a search index of 350.00.

In the sixth position, we have Lisa from BLACKPINK who had a search index of 346.00. Jin placed seventh with a search index of 242.86. A bit behind him is Jennie who took over the eight position with a search index of 206.25. Claiming the ninth and 10th spot were RM and J-Hope with a search index of 203.70 and 166.67 respectively. Jisoo and Rosé were placed 11th and 12th with a search index of 115.00 and 110.81 respectively.

Next up, we have Suzy of Miss A who took over the 13th position with a search index of 106.67. Claiming the 14th and 15th spot were Baekhyun of EXO and G-Dragon of BIGBANG with a search index of 105.56 and 100.00 respectively. Chen of EXO and Heechul of Super Junior placed in the 16th and 17th position with a search index of 100.00 and 99.95 respectively.

Rounding up the Top 20 were Tzuyu of TWICE, Eunwoo of ASTRO and Chayeol of EXO who claimed the 18th, 19th and 20th spot with a search index of 95.83, 93.33 and 90.38 respectively.

ALSO READ: BTS: V shares that he's been taking English online classes; Jungkook REVEALS how he maintains his physique

Meanwhile, speaking of BTS, the septet plans to take over the second half of 2020 as well which starts with the release of a new single titled Dynamite. The upcoming song, which is in English and will have upbeat vibes similar to their previous hits like Mic Drop and Waste It On Me, will drop on August 21. Moreover, there is a packed promotion schedule for Dynamite which will feature many teases. Once the track is released along with Dynamite MV, we'll see BTS participate in various US interviews.

Moreover, BTS will also be blessing VMAs 2020 with a performance of Dynamite. What makes this particular performance special is the fact that it's the first time BTS is performing at the Video Music Awards. Moreover, the septet has been nominated for three awards - Best Pop, Best Choreography and Best K-pop, all for the lead single of Map of the Soul: 7, On. We'll get to see the boys perform when the VMAs 2020 takes place on August 31, 2020.

That's not all! BTS is also working hard on their next album which will be out in the coming few months. If Jin's accidental spoiler is anything to go by, the untitled album will be dropping in October. One thing's for sure; it will be BTS' most personal work yet. Not only are they responsible for the producing part of the songs, but the members have also taken part in the other key responsibilities like album jacket cover, which was revealed to have been recently shot.

Then there's In the Soop BTS ver. which premieres on JTBC in South Korea from August 19 and will see the members go on a healing trip. The new variety show will see BTS at their calmest as they enjoy outdoor activities like fishing and practising yoga.

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Combined AFL and AFLW rights key driver of Google Australia sponsorship - SportBusiness

Posted: 06 Aug 2020 08:22 AM PDT

Google Australia made its third deal with the Australian Football League (AFL) in three years when it signed as an Official Partner of the AFL, including new rights to the AFLW women's league, last month.

Google had signed separate one-year deals in 2018 and 2019 for IP rights attached to the AFL men's league only. The new deal is for three years from 2020 to 2022.

Industry experts value the deal at about A$1m (€610,000/€720,000) per year – the AFL's new target price for men's league sponsorships with IP rights. The target price for AFLW sponsorships is now about A$350,000 per year.

The deal was made by multiple executives across the Google and AFL teams, led by Kylie Rogers, general manager of commercial at AFL and Aisling Finch, director of marketing at Google Australia and New Zealand. No agency was involved.

The new deal took longer than initially expected to complete and announce – it was made public in July – because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Deal process

Rogers told SportBusiness Sponsorship that the relationship with Google had developed over a series of brainstorming sessions to establish ways to put Google at the heart of the fan experience.

The deal also reflects the AFL's commitment to a more flexible way of working with sponsors since Rogers joined the organisation in 2018.

She said: "There were so many stock, fixed sponsorship deals, with branding always at the heart. It's important to make them more values-based and strategic – and more agile; we're prepared to work with the partner in what they're trying to achieve."

According to Finch, Google viewed the sponsorship as long term from the outset.

"We spent the first two years or so understanding each other's businesses more – and looking at where we could really support and help each other," she said.

"I think that definitely paid off, and allowed us to expand the breadth, depth and length of the deal over time. The more we have come to understand footy fans, the more we have been able to find ways to engage with them in new and exciting ways – including voting for their favourite player."

The addition of AFLW rights was important, said Finch, because the women's league has gone "from strength to strength over the past few years – and we want to help continue that journey".

Interest in the AFLW has grown by more than 3,600 per cent on five years ago, she said, and, in 2019, Carlton Football Club AFLW star Tayla Harris was the most-searched footballer irrespective of gender.

Activation points

The two organisations have activated the relationship across multiple touch points since the first agreement in 2018 focused on the Google Voice app and Google Nest devices, which were enabled to get immediate access to AFL scores, news, trivia and more.

In 2019, live scores and highlights were added to the Google Search experience for fans, and the association between the two organisations expanded to give fans the opportunity to have their say on Google Search, voting on categories such as the Player of the Round and the Fan Awards.

The year was topped off by a short film, 'A Season in Search', highlighting how 11 million fans engaged with the AFL through Google Search.

At the start of 2020, fans could also vote on the Mark of the Year and Goal of the Year nominees from each round of AFLW play, as well as for the Best on Ground in the State of Origin Bushfire Appeal game.

Google-owned YouTube also hosts highlights from every game, as well as AFL Media content generated by the AFL's own content and production house. The league also partners in Google-led productions.

Google is also interested in above-the-line campaigns with the AFL's broadcasters to "maximise the uptick", according to Rogers. "These are separate broadcast partner deals, but they have the to negotiate with them as part of our deal."

Under the new deal, the AFL and Google will be exploring ways Google Cloud can help further enhance the fan experience. "Cloud is becoming more important to all of us, but I can't see the day when someone owns that category," Rogers said.

Measurement of success

Given Google does not especially require branding exposure in the Australian market, its main business reason for sponsoring the AFL is based on enhancing the overall fan experience .

"Ultimately, we know that when we put the fan (or user) first and create experiences that they love, it translates into results for our partner's business and for Google, too," Finch said.

She said the search engine had seen "strong engagement" from AFL fans across Google's products.

"Aussies are obsessed with sports, with 92 per cent of us showing an interest in one way or another; eight of the top 10 TV shows in Australia last year were live sports, and we're seeing great engagement on YouTube as well.

"Despite our smaller population, AFL is one of the most attended sports in the world, and the most searched for in Australia each year. So we know that sport is something that really connects Aussies, and matters to us.

"With our AFL partnership, we really want to help fans engage with the game they love in new ways – that has always been our main goal. And that's the case across our full range of products and services, from Search to YouTube and our in-home devices."

How top Google searches have changed during the coronavirus - Washington Post

Posted: 17 Apr 2020 12:00 AM PDT

April 2019 was a simpler time. Americans wanted to know what a black hole was, who was playing in the Final Four and how many episodes of "Game of Thrones" there were.

This April, we suddenly need to know how to make masks, and millions more are searching for how to file for unemployment. There are some constants in life, though: We still need help nailing the perfect boiled egg.

We compared top Google searches during the same weeks in 2019 and 2020 to see what has and hasn't changed.

How to

  • get through the outbreak
  • make a mask
  • make hand sanitizer
  • apply for unemployment
  • get through the outbreak

How to

  • stay safe
  • make a mask
  • make hand sanitizer
  • cut your own hair
  • stay safe

Most common Google searches beginning with "how to" from April 5 to 11.

Train Your Dragon 3

make a mask

make hand sanitizer

take a screenshot

take a screenshot

change PSN name

file for unemployment

make French toast

Get Away With Murder

cut your own hair

make slime

make whipped coffee

lose weight

make buttermilk

solve a Rubik's cube

change background on Zoom

delete Instagram

watch Trolls 2

lose belly fat

get free Robux

write a check

delete Instagram

scan a network for hidden cameras

dye Easter eggs

Near-duplicate searches have been consolidated. For instance, "how to make a face mask" is

combined with "how to make a mask."

Train Your Dragon

make a mask with fabric

also: Train Your Dragon 3

also: make a mask, make a face mask with fabric, make a mask with a bandana...

take a screenshot

also: screenshot on a Mac, take a screenshot on a Mac, screenshot on Windows

make hand sanitizer

also: hard boil eggs

take a screenshot

also: screenshot on Mac, screenshot on

Chromebook

also: draw a rose

file for unemployment

change PSN name

also: apply for unemployment

Get Away With Murder

make French toast

also: Get Away With A Murderer

make slime

cut your own hair

make whipped coffee

lose weight

make buttermilk

solve a Rubik's cube

change background on Zoom

delete an Instagram account

watch Trolls World Tour

lose belly fat

get free Robux

write a check

delete Instagram

scan networks for hidden cameras

dye Easter eggs

A pandemic introduces new necessities. Face masks are recommended and in some places required and hand sanitizer is in short supply. So people are searching for instructions on how to do it themselves.

We're still trying to take screenshots (especially on Macs!), quit Instagram and learn to draw. To pass the time, we're learning how to make some suddenly trendy foods — like whipped coffee — as well as classics like French toast.

At least we're no longer searching for how to "scan networks for hidden cameras." April 2019 didn't feature a sudden influx of secret agents: the search was probably inspired by an Irish family that found a camera live-streaming from their Airbnb.

Where

  • to find what I need
  • to buy toilet paper
  • did covid-19 come from
  • is my stimulus check
  • to find what I need

Where

  • to find what I need
  • is toilet paper
  • did covid-19 come from
  • is my stimulus check
  • to find what I need

Most common Google searches beginning with "where" from April 5 to 11.

is my tax refund

the Crawdads Sing

to buy toilet paper

is my tax refund

did coronavirus come from

is Auburn University

the Crawdads Sing

is Texas Tech

is the Final Four

to buy cloth face mask

were Bonnie and Clyde killed

the Wild Things Are

is my federal tax return

is Coachella

is your appendix

is Joe Exotic now

the Wild Things Are

is my stimulus check

to eat near me

the heart is

the knife points on the treasure map

are the Ozarks

to watch Trolls World Tour

is Baylor University

is the Grand Canyon

is Ozark filmed

Near-duplicate searches have been consolidated. For instance, "where is my state tax refund" is

combined with "where is my refund."

is my refund

also: my refund, is my state refund, is my federal refund, is my tax refund

also: am I right now

the Crawdads Sing

also: am I right now

is my refund

to buy toilet paper

also: my refund, is my state refund, is my federal refund, is my tax refund

also: can I buy toilet paper, to buy toilet paper online, to find toilet paper

is Auburn University

did coronavirus come from

also: is Auburn, is Auburn basketball team from

also: did the coronavirus come from, did covid 19 come from, did covid-19 originate,

the Crawdads Sing

is Texas Tech

is the Final Four

also: is the NCAA championship game being played

to buy cloth face mask

also: to buy face masks, to buy masks

were Bonnie and Clyde killed

also: did Bonnie and Clyde died, was Bonnie and Clyde killed

the Wild Things Are

is Coachella

is my federal tax return

is your appendix

is Joe Exotic now

the Wild Things Are

is my stimulus check

to eat near me

the heart is

the knife points on the treasure

map

are the Ozarks

to watch Trolls World Tour

is Baylor University

also: can I watch Trolls World Tour

is the Grand Canyon

is Ozark filmed

The new where-to searches in 2020 focus on finding goods like toilet paper and face masks. Money is also a top concern. Tax refund checks were at the top of the list in both years, and stimulus checks are a major question in 2020.

Big group events — remember those? — feature prominently in 2019′s searches. Google users wanted to know the locations of Auburn and Texas Tech, two of the men's basketball teams in the Final Four, as well as the location of Baylor, the champion of the women's bracket.

At-home entertainment, on the other hand, hasn't changed much. Joe Exotic from "Tiger King" swapped out for Bonny and Clyde from 2019′s "The Highwaymen." Otherwise, books like "Where The Crawdads Sing" and "Where The Wild Things Are" are still popular, as is the mysterious merchant Xur in the video game "Destiny 2."

What is

  • the new normal
  • Zoom
  • a virus
  • furlough
  • the new normal

What is

  • the new normal
  • Zoom
  • a virus
  • furlough
  • the new normal

Most common Google searches beginning with "what is" from April 5 to 11.

Good Friday

a black hole

the weather

the weather

a Prince Albert

coronavirus

the 2020 census #census

Similar searches have been consolidated. For instance, "what is Easter" was combined with "what is Good Friday."

Good Friday

also: my IP address

also: Palm Sunday, Easter

a black hole

the weather

also: the weather today, the temperature

also: my IP address

also: CBD oil

the weather

a Prince Albert

coronavirus

the 2020 Census #census

Passover and Easter fell earlier in 2020 than in 2019, driving searches about both holidays. Other searches reflect the new normal: video calls on Zoom, furloughs from work, and constant advertisements for the short-form video streaming app Quibi.

Some of 2020′s searches veered toward the adult, a sign of many bored adults trapped at home. A platform called OnlyFans, a subscription service popular with adult entertainers, gained traction, and searches for Prince Albert piercings went up, possibly because of Joe Exotic.

If the days blend together while staying at home, take heart: We also lost track of time in 2019. The fourth most common what-is search in both 2019 and 2020 was "what is today?"

How many

  • people have covid-19
  • covid-19 deaths
  • ounces in a gallon
  • deaths on 9/11
  • people have covid-19

How many

  • people have covid-19
  • covid-19 deaths
  • ounces in a gallon
  • deaths on 9/11
  • people have covid-19

Most common Google searches beginning with "how many" from April 5 to 11.

3s in the image

ounces in a gallon

ounces in a gallon

ounces in a pound

cases of coronavirus in the U.S.

weeks in a year

episodes of The Act

ounces in a pound

people are in the world

people live in the U.S.

feet in a mile

have died from

coronavirus

people did Bonnie and

Clyde kill

weeks in a year

kids does Nipsey

Hussle have

countries are there

people are in the world

countries are there

people died in 9/11

calories in a banana

animals are going towards the river

miles is a 5k

episodes of Game of

Thrones are there

feet in a mile

people die in the U.S. every day

calories in a pound

people live in the U.S.

people die from the flu

letters in the alphabet

Measurement conversions and similar searches have been consolidated. For instance, "cups in a gallon" is combined with "ounces in a gallon."

ounces in a gallon

3s in the image

also: ounces in a cup, cups in a quart, quarts in a gallon, cups in a gallon, oz in a gallon...

also: eye test how many 3s

ounces in a gallon

ounces in a pound

also: ounces in a cup, cups in a quart, oz in a gallon, tablespoons in a cup, oz in a gallon...

also: grams in an ounce, grams in a pound, oz in a pound, pounds in a ton

cases of coronavirus in U.S.

weeks in a year

also: how many coronavirus cases in U.S.

also: days in a year, hours in a year

ounces in a pound

episodes of The Act

also: grams in an ounce, oz in a pound

people are in the world

people live in the U.S.

feet in a mile

people have died from coronavirus

also: steps in a mile, feet in a yard, square feet in an acre, inches in a foot...

also: how many deaths from coronavirus

weeks in a year

people did Bonnie and Clyde kill

countries are there

also: countries in the world, countries are in the world

kids does Nipsey Hussle have

people are in the world

countries are there

people died in 9/11

calories in a banana

animals are going towards the river

miles is a 5k

feet in a mile

episodes of Game of Thrones are

there

also: steps in a mile

people die in the U.S. every day

calories in a pound

people live in the U.S.

The bulk of 2020′s how-many searches involve the scale of the pandemic. Americans search for how many people have the virus and how many people have died. But they also search for comparisons, asking how many people are in the United States, how many died on 9/11 and how many die on a normal day.

Some of most common searches in 2020 are viral brain teasers, which ask readers to count 3s, triangles and animals — again, we are very bored. But questions about the scale of the pandemic drive out other concerns, like episodes of TV shows, calorie counting and celebrity gossip.

How can I help?

When disaster strikes, people search for how they can help. Searches for "how can I help" spiked in late March and early April of 2020, surpassing the number of searches after Hurricane Harvey flooded Houston.

April 2020

Covid-19 pandemic

August 2017

Hurricane Harvey

January 2020

Fires in Australia

June 2018

Immigrant family

separation

April 2020

Covid-19 pandemic

August 2017

Hurricane Harvey lands in Houston

January 2020

Fires in Australia

June 2018

Immigrant family

separation policies

April 2020

Google Trends measures search volume using a scale from zero to 100. One hundred indicates the week where the most people searched for the phrase "how can I help."

If you want to help during the pandemic, we have some ideas. Stay safe, and keep searching.

Australia's illiteracy problem exposed in mock film trailer from Emotive, Google and the UN - Mumbrella

Posted: 06 Aug 2020 04:52 PM PDT

A message about Australia's illiteracy problem has been disguised in a film trailer.

The campaign uses YouTube's ad sequencing tool, and starts out with a user being served a combination of short teaser films to build intrigue for a 60-second film trailer. Those who skipped the trailer are then put on a path of being served follow up films in which the protagonist's situation worsens. For users who watched the full trailer, they are served a new ad in which the protagonist gets saved from her plane wreck.

To those who can't read, the content piece would appear to be a film trailer. It is the on screen words which reveal the extent of Australia's problem.

The campaign supports the UN's global goals for sustainable development, one of which is access to quality education. In Australia, over half a million people between 15 and 18-years-old are illiterate.

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Simon Joyce, CEO and founder of Emotive, said tackling the issue of illiteracy was a proud moment for the agency.

"We are incredibly proud to be partnering with Google and the United Nations to shine a light on some of the shortcomings of the education system in this country. Education liberates the intellect, unlocks the imagination and is fundamental to self-respect. Of course, none of that is possible without the simple requirement of literacy, something that a surprising number of Australians struggle with. We hope that this campaign can spark critical discussion that leads to change," Joyce said.

Agency group creative director, Ben Clare, added the campaign both addresses the issue and demonstrates how it can escalate.

"We wanted to draw attention to the goal by way of a simple demonstration, and by making people empathise with the problem. The idea was to draw viewers in with a movie trailer – one of YouTube's most searched categories. Only ours contained a hidden message about illiteracy. To illiterate audiences, it was seen as a dramatic film trailer. To anyone who can read, we created a stark reminder of the difference quality education can make in people's lives," he said.

Emotive also put together a case study explaining the course of the campaign which can be viewed here:

Fiona Walford, head of creative development for Google Australia, said the campaign highlights the storytelling capabilities of YouTube.

"We were looking for best-in-class global agencies – leaned into YouTube, with proven credentials, and great client examples on the platform – to showcase the possibilities of creating sequential stories on Youtube."

The 'Trojan Trailer' films were produced by Good Oil Films. Director, Michelle Savill was committed to making it look as much like a real film trailer as possible.

"I wanted people to really think they were watching a trailer, so it had to have scale. Getting a plane out to the dunes and shooting under a summer sun was challenging in the best way and worth it for the spectacular visuals. I'm really proud of what we've achieved," Savill said.

Credits

Creative Agency: Emotive
Group Creative Director – Ben Clare
Managing Partner and Head of Strategy – Michael Hogg
Designer – Alex King
Business Director – Sarah Clifton
Head of Distribution – Jamie Crick
CEO – Simon Joyce

Production Company: Good Oil
Director – Michelle Savill
Producer – Amanda Yu
Executive Producer – Andrew McLean
Executive Producer – Sam Long
D.O.P – Jason White
Editor – Dan Kircher
Production Designer – Cherith Crozier

Post Production:
Blockhead

Music:
Cam Ballantyne

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