Wednesday, July 31, 2019

“Marianne Williamson is most-searched for candidate on Google and tops Drudge Report poll - Daily Mail” plus 2 more

“Marianne Williamson is most-searched for candidate on Google and tops Drudge Report poll - Daily Mail” plus 2 more


Marianne Williamson is most-searched for candidate on Google and tops Drudge Report poll - Daily Mail

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 09:43 PM PDT

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit.  

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate.   

Google Trends data showed the author was the most-searched candidate in 49 states during the debate. The only state where she didn't dominate search trends was Montana, where Gov Steve Bullock took that slot.  

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate.  

She drove discussion online, as much for her quirky mannerisms and new-age jargon as for her policy ideas.

Perhaps Williamson's most impactful moment was when she appeared to 'yodel' while delivering a lecture on healthcare - while her comment about President Donald Trump inspiring 'dark psychic forces' was a close second.   

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate. The author was all smiles as she spoke to reporters afterward

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate. The author was all smiles as she spoke to reporters afterward

The graphic above shows the change in Google Trends data on most searched candidates before the debate.
As soon as the debate started Williamson became the most-searched in 49 states. The only state she didn't dominate was Montana, where Bullock is governor
Slide me

The graphic above shows the change in Google Trends data on most searched candidates before and during the debate. Before the debate Sanders, Warren, Williamson, Bullock and Klobuchar split the map, but as soon as it started Williamson became the most-searched in 49 states. The only state she didn't dominate was Montana, where Bullock is governor

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate. On the stage from left to right are: Marianne Williamson, Tim Ryan, Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Beto O'Rourke, John Hickenlooper, John Delaney and Steve Bullock

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate. On the stage from left to right are: Marianne Williamson, Tim Ryan, Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Beto O'Rourke, John Hickenlooper, John Delaney and Steve Bullock

There were very few breakout moments across the debate as candidates teetered between slamming Trump and attacking each other, unsure whether to spend their time onstage trying to win the primary contest or the 2020 general election.

Front-runner Elizabeth Warren, who dominated the first debate last month, gave another strong performance and took up the most air time at 18 minutes and 33 seconds. 

The Massachusetts senator and her closest competitor, Vermont Sen Bernie Sanders, shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms. 

They both came out on top with speaking time, Sanders trailing Warren at 17 minutes and 45 seconds, as CNN allowed candidates extra time to respond to direct attacks. 

Warren was declared the winner of the first debate but received little credit for it as she wasn't up against any top five candidates. 

This time her performance is expected to have more of an impact as she was sharing the stage with  

Analyst Bill Palmer picked Warren as his winner again this time, saying her performance will have more of an impact given that she was sharing the stage with Sanders and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg. 

Palmer felt that Sanders didn't do himself any favors.  

'Warren has been climbing in the polls over the past month, partly at Bernie's expense,' he wrote. 'Tonight was his chance to show that he could hang in there with Warren, and it simply did not happen. Bernie got in some good moments, and he didn't hurt himself tonight. But he needed a win, and he didn't get it.'

CNN Editor-at-Large Chris Cillizza disagreed, naming Sanders as one of his winners.  

'He came out feisty -- and stayed that way,' he wrote. 'Asked about former Maryland Rep. John Delaney's criticism of his health care plan, Sanders responded bluntly, 'You're wrong.' Questioned about his single-payer "Medicare for All" plan, Sanders snapped, "I wrote the damn bill." 

'Sure, Sanders probably came across to some people as irascible and scoldy. But for liberals looking for Sanders to stand up proudly and unapologetically for the need for huge structural change in our politics and our culture got exactly what they wanted. 

'And not for nothing, Sanders clearly outshone Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren in this debate.'

Front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren took up the most air time as they shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms

Front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren took up the most air time as they shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms

Buttigieg was one of the steadiest candidates on the stage, but Palmer said he also didn't fare as well as he did in the first debate.

'He did well enough tonight, but he was hurt by not being on stage with [Kamala] Harris and [Joe] Biden,' he wrote. 

Cillizza agreed that Buttigieg played it safe, but praised his 'clear message: I am young, yes, but the older people on stage with me haven't fixed any of these problems, so it's time for something different.' 

The three moderate candidates who came in with the lowest poll numbers - former Maryland congressman John Delaney, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper and Ohio Rep Tim Ryan - appeared to have the same strategy of standing out by taking on Sanders and Warren.  

The plan backfired as they each made several of the same point and morphed into one voice. 

Delaney's only breakout moment came as he went head to head with Warren, who, as Palmer put it, 'steamrolled him to the point that it was almost comical'. 

Bullock was the most effective moderate on the stage, spending much of his 11 minutes of speaking time blasting 'wish-list economics' and pie-in-the-sky policies while touting his track record in GOP territory.  

'If moderates were looking for someone other than former Vice President Joe Biden to support in this primary, Bullock offered himself as a viable alternative,' Cillizza wrote. 

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows
O'Rourke and Klobuchar each spoke for just under 11 minutes

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows. They each spoke for just under 11 minutes

Both former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows. They each spoke for just under 11 minutes. 

Cillizza said of O'Rourke: 'While he was mildly more energetic than in the first debate, there were large swaths of the debate where he simply disappeared from the conversation. 

'And too many times when he did have a chance to speak, he sounded too rehearsed and wooden, a problem that plagued him in the first debate.  

Klobuchar, Cillizza says, appeared to be 'treading water in search of a moment or surge'. 

With night one down, all eyes are now on California Sen Kamala Harris and former Vice President Joe Biden - who should have plenty to say about Tuesday's debate.   

Marianne Williamson's greatest debate hits – including a 'Seinfeld' hat-tip and a YODEL

Only one other Democrat spoke less than new-age guru Marianne Williamson during the July 30, 2019 primary debate, but she made the most of her time, dominating online discussion afterward with quips, quotables – and even a yodel.

'DARK PSYCHIC FORCES'

Williamson warned against substituting policy intellectual discussions for emotional appeals to thwart President Trump's use of racially charged language:

'If you think any of this wonkiness is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country, then I'm afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days.'

SLAVERY'S 'EMOTIONAL TURBULENCE'

Williamson defended her recommendation to devote as much as $500 billion to paying reparations to the descendants of African slaves:

'People heal when there's some deep truth-telling. We need to recognize that when it comes to the economic gap between blacks and whites in America, it does come from a great injustice that has never been dealt with. That great injustice has had to do with the fact that there was 250 years of slavery followed by another hundred years of domestic terrorism.

'What makes me qualified to say $200 billion to $500 billion? I'll tell you what makes me qualified. If you did the math of the 40 acres and a mule, given that there was 4 million to 5 million slaves at the end of the Civil War, four to five -- and they were all promised 40 acres and a mule for every family of four, if you did the math today, it would be trillions of dollars. And I believe that anything less than $100 billion is an insult.

'And I believe that $200 billion to $500 billion is politically feasible today, because so many Americans realize there is an injustice that continues to form a toxicity underneath the surface, an emotional turbulence that only reparations will heal.'

A 'SEINFELD' MOMENT

Asked about gun violence, Williamson lumped it into a longer list of Democratic bugbears that she believes can be defeated by taking their money out of the American political system. She ended with a hat-tip to a 1997 episode of 'Seinfeld':

'The issue of gun safety, of course, is that the NRA has us in a chokehold, but so do the pharmaceutical companies, so do the health insurance companies, so do the fossil fuel companies, and so do the defense contractors, and none of this will change until we either pass a constitutional amendment or pass legislation that establishes public funding for federal campaigns.

'But for politicians, including my fellow candidates, who themselves have taken tens of thousands -- and in some cases, hundreds of thousands -- of dollars from these same corporate donors to think that they now have the moral authority to say we're going to take them on, I don't think the Democratic Party should be surprised that so many Americans believe – "Yada, yada, yada".'

THE YODEL

As Williamson schooled her opponents on how to avoid letting Republicans outmaneuver them on healthcare, her voice suddenly jumped octaves:

'I have to say, I'm normally way over there with Bernie and Elizabeth on this one,' she said. But an unexpected vocal tic made it sound like 'I'm normally way-ee-ay over there.'

KISD educator attends STEM conference on Google scholarship - Kilgore News Herald

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 10:01 PM PDT

A Kilgore ISD employee recently attended a national conference for computer science teachers and her trip was fully funded by a Google scholarship.

According to a KISD press release, Rachel Hooten, Instructional Technology Coordinator for KISD, attended Computer Science Teachers National Conference in Phoenix, Arizona July 7-10.

The conference was held to give educators and administrators a chance to learn, discuss, present and collaborate on hot topics, ideas, trends and needs for students in computer science, according to the press release.

"Thanks to a scholarship from Google, (Hooten) was able to attend the conference to research more about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and computer science opportunities available to be brought back to Kilgore ISD and the students of KISD. Google sponsored workshops on Coding, Algorithms, Applications of English Writing into Coding and Machine Learning just to name a few," the release read.

At the conference reception, Hooten gave a short speech about the importance of computer science education in her experience as a KISD educator.

"Sharing my experiences with computer science and teaching coding to students was an empowering moment for me," Hooten said.

"I will never forget the words of a young girl I taught to code, 'You have opened a door for me. A door that will never, ever, ever close.' How powerful is that? That is the power of computer science and that is what we can do for our students."

Internet of Things: Regulationa and Consumer Products - The National Law Review

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 02:31 PM PDT

IoT: International Framework

Technological Revolutions are quiet and astonishing. Step by step new technological applications are pushing existing paradigms and changing the way business is transacted by consumers, companies and in society. In the past, electricity and printing had a revolutionary role in social development, shifting all sectors of life. These days, the Internet of Things (IoT) is pivotal in creating quick, profound and quiet transformations.

According to the Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation of OCED:

The Internet of Things (IoT) could soon be as commonplace as electricity in the everyday lives of people in OECD countries. As such, it will play a fundamental role in economic and social development in ways that would have been challenging to predict as recently as two or three decades ago[1].

In 2008-2009, according to Cisco IBSG - Internet Business Solutions, there were more connected objects, such as smartphones, tablets and computers, than the world's population. Therefore, this period is considered the year that IoT was born[2]. In 2008, Rob Van Kranemburg published "The Internet of Things", which addresses a new paradigm in which objects produce information.

Supporting CISCO's statement, the chart below of Google Trends shows the period of time during which popularity in searches on Google increased. In the last 5 years, IoT has sharply rocketed as a very attractive subject in the general mind of the people on the internet[3]:

Compliance Risks Chart 1
Interest Overtime (2004-2019) As Search Item

Digging deeper we can see that IoT popularity is not only relevant to internet users or to some futuristic curiosity on Google, it is a real and concrete "combination of network connectivity, widespread sensor placement, and sophisticated data analysis techniques" which enables "applications to aggregate and act on large amounts of data generated by IoT devices in homes, public spaces, industry and the natural world"[4].

The potential benefits of this kind of connectivity are immense: real-time monitoring and more accurate metrics, the ability to remotely control various actions, interconnectivity and automation, plus the ease of handling a variety of devices that can be centralized on just one smartphone. Nonetheless, this technological avalanche also brings risks and vulnerabilities to users, such as increased vigilance over our habits, exposure of our personal data, hacking vulnerabilities, global or cascading failures, among others.

In the last two years, a set of supporting policy actions have been adopted by the European Commission to accelerate the take-up of IoT and to unleash its potential in Europe for the benefit of European citizens and businesses[5]. These policy actions and statements are not only a guess or shallow forecast, they are a serious result of data and market analysis that came from several studies which found impressive numbers such as 11 billion connected 'things' in 2018[6]. This could be as many as 20 billion connections by 2020[7], about 6 billion of which will be in Europe[8]. Of these, 60-65% are consumer devices.

According to the Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI) more than 65% of businesses are expected to use IoT products by 2020, compared to 30% in 2017. Europe accounts for more than a third of global Industrial IoT investments by 2020. The market is expected to grow at an impressive average annual rate of 22%. Reaching a value of €287 billion in 2020, Industrial IoT is Europe's largest IoT market[9].

Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges

The Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI), an Agency of the Netherland's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and part of the development cooperation effort of the foreign relations of the Netherlands conducted research on the IoT in Europe in January 2019. It concluded:

The European market for Internet of Things (IoT) solutions is growing. Western and Northern Europe are especially promising. Both consumer and business IoT offer opportunities, but specialisation may give you a competitive advantage. The home, health and finance sectors are front runners. National and European initiatives are working to stimulate the roll-out of Industrial IoT solutions and lower barriers. The shortage of skilled specialists continues to drive outsourcing[10].

Apart from an advantageous and "smart" business opportunity, IoT can facilitate innovation in the private sector supporting a wide range of innovative businesses, not only raising the productivity level but increasing the accountability and responsiveness of companies and its employees, improving the client confidence.

Thus, IoT can work to facilitate Private Sector Innovation by so-called industrial Internet, Next Production Revolution (NPR)[11], autonomous machines and big data[12] and automotive industry[13]. On the other hand, innovative Public Sector Delivery with IoT applications could provide smart cities[14], smart governments, smart street lighting[15] and traffic flow optimization[16], innovation in healthcare practice and delivery[17]. IoT technologies are, therefore, expected to play a major role in improving the management of transport, energy use, water services, education, employment, health, crime prevention, by making society more efficient, innovative, safe, sustainable, and inclusive[18].

Regardless of all the benefits, there are many challenges and risks associated with IoT digital security, such as cyber attacks, digital incidents and privacy challenges. Furthermore, bad outcomes can happen causing physical consequences in case of the wrongdoing of autonomous vehicles, health care tools or industrial machines.

The Vision of IoT in 2020

First of all, the 2020 scenario might be approached by a combination of the Cloud and Big Data. Nowadays the hyperconnectivity[19] of society drives IoT to be "The Next Big Thing" in business. According to OECD this next big thing will be related to "a sophisticated industry ecosystem consisting of vendors (providing components), suppliers (creating solutions), service providers, and enterprise users in all sectors of the economy" that will be "measured in billions of Euro in Europe alone, and that will extend across the world too"[20].

Could expectations be too high? Maybe not, because of the following points: I) the centrality of IoT in the upcoming years is corroborated by the sheer number of connections that are expected to be in place by 2020; II) IoT ecosystem will have grown to encompass not only the traditional supply-side actors, but also a rising number of businesses and organizations serving and using  IoT; III) hyper-connected society will be an established reality by 2020, as most of the "things" that can be connected, will be by then.

In 2018, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published a study considering initiatives on the future of production. Essentially, it gives an insight into: I) Solution-driven: technology can tackle and solve challenges that have previously been insurmountable; ii) Human-centric: technology can unlock human potential by unleashing creativity, innovation and productivity in new ways; iii) Sustainable: technology can promote sound production processes that minimize negative environmental impact, conserve energy and resources and enable carbon neutrality; iv) Inclusive: employees, companies and countries at different stages of development benefit from Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies and the transformation of production systems[21].

One of its conclusions is that in the coming years, the IoT market is expected to grow across Europe. Most of the front runners are Western European countries, which have traditionally invested more in IT. And together, six countries make up more than 75% of the European IoT market, this makes them especially promising target markets for 2020.

Market Size in Europe
Chart 2. IoT Market Size in Europe

Further, apart from the geographic localization of the opportunities arising, to have a real and concrete overview it is important to be aware of the market size and 2020 forecast by sector. By 2020, industrial IoT is predicted to consist of:

  • 60% cross-industry devices - used in multiple industries, mainly to save costs;
  • 40% vertical-specific devices - used in a specific industry to improve efficiency/accuracy.
  •  
  • Industrial IoT also offers good opportunities, as the average spending per device is much higher in this sector. This makes total spending on consumer and industrial IoT about equal by 2020[22].

 

Compliance and Risks Chart 3
Chart 3: IoT Market Size Per Sector

Based on the US Dollar: Euro exchange rates in October 2018, the global average spending on IoT devices is expected to be:

  • €102 per consumer device;
  • €114 per cross-industry business device;
  • €239 per vertical-specific business device.

Finally, electronic sensors are now everywhere - in smartphones, cars, home electronic systems, healthcare devices, fitness monitors and in the workplace. It has been estimated that, by 2020, over 200 billion sensor devices will be inter-connected, creating a market size that, by 2025, will be between $2.7 trillion and $3 trillion a year[23].

At the same time, the market opportunity will bring regulatory challenges. The next section of this report will analyze by specific studies the impact of regulatory requirements on IoT devices and deployment.


[1]  OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 5. Available here.

[2] MANCINI, Monica. Internet das Coisas: História, Conceitos, Aplicações e Desafios. Available here. 

[3] Interest over time. Numbers represent search interest relative to the highest point on the chart for the given region and time. A value of 100 is the peak popularity for the term. A value of 50 means that the term is half as popular. A score of 0 means there was not enough data for this term. The information is available here.

[4] Idem, p. 5.

[5] European Commission. Digital Single Market. Policies: Internet of Things. Available here.

[6] Gartner, Inc. Press Release. Gartner Says 8.4 Billion Connected "Things" Will Be in Use in 2017, Up 31 Percent From 2016. February 2017. Available here.

[7] Idem, Leading the IoT. Gartner Insights on How to Lead in a Connected World. 2017. P. 2.

[8] European Commission. Definition of a Research and Innovation Policy Leveraging Cloud Computing and IoT Combination. FINAL REPORT. A study prepared for the European Commission. DG Communications Networks, Content & Technology. Digital Agenda for Europe. Available here.

[9] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[10] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[11] (NPR) entails a confluence of technologies ranging from a variety of digital technologies (e.g. 3D printing, the Internet of Things [IoT] and advanced robotics) to new materials (e.g. bio- or nano-based) to new processes (e.g. data-driven production, artificial intelligence [AI] and synthetic biology). The Next Production Revolution. A Report to G20. OECD, 2017. Available here.

[12] Autonomous machines and the use of big data are increasingly present in agriculture. Robots can now sort plants based on optical recognition, harvest lettuce and recognise rotten apples. Idem, Ibidem.

[13] The automotive industry is one of the sectors most affected by interconnectivity and enhanced efficiency in both production and operation of vehicles. Idem, Ibidem.

[14] "Smart city plans explore the ability to process huge masses of data coming from devices such as video cameras, parking sensors and air-quality monitors to help local governments achieve goals in terms of increased public safety, improved environment and better quality of life. In: OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 16.

[15]"Dublin (Ireland), Oslo (Norway) and Chattanooga, Tennessee in the United States have started to use smart street lighting systems.29 Often triggered by replacing municipal lighting with LED solutions to save on energy costs, smart street lighting can offer combined savings of up to USD 100 per streetlight per year". Idem, Ibidem.

[16]"The SCOOT system developed by Transport for London uses data on road usage with real-time control of traffic lights in the city to deliver on average a 12% improvement in traffic flow. Other large cities, like Beijing, São Paulo, Toronto or Preston have introduced SCOOT". Idem, Ibidem.

[17]"Smaller sensors, smartphone assisted readouts, big data analysis and continuous remote monitoring can enable new ways of managing care. Such a digital health feedback system includes wearable and that work together to gather information about medication-taking, activity and rest patterns. Idem. p.15.

[18] UN General Assembly, Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, A/HRC/32/38 (2016), P.12.

[19] A term invented by Canadian social scientists Anabel Quan-Haase and Barry Wellman, it refers to the use of multiple means of communication, such as email, instant messaging, telephone, face-to-face contact and Web 2.0 information services.

[20] OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 24.

[21] World Economic Forum. Insight Report. Readiness for the Future of Production. Report 2018. Available here.

[22] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[23] Russo et al. Exploring regulations and scope of the Internet of Things in contemporary companies: a first literature analysis. Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, 2015, P. 5.

Copyright © 2019 Compliance and Risks Ltd.

“Marianne Williamson is most-searched for candidate on Google and tops Drudge Report poll - Daily Mail” plus 2 more


Marianne Williamson is most-searched for candidate on Google and tops Drudge Report poll - Daily Mail

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 09:43 PM PDT

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit

Marianne Williamson's 2020 presidential campaign has gained momentum as the self-help guru became the most-searched for candidate during Tuesday's debate in Detroit.  

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate.   

Google Trends data showed the author was the most-searched candidate in 49 states during the debate. The only state where she didn't dominate search trends was Montana, where Gov Steve Bullock took that slot.  

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate.  

She drove discussion online, as much for her quirky mannerisms and new-age jargon as for her policy ideas.

Perhaps Williamson's most impactful moment was when she appeared to 'yodel' while delivering a lecture on healthcare - while her comment about President Donald Trump inspiring 'dark psychic forces' was a close second.   

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate. The author was all smiles as she spoke to reporters afterward

While she took up the second-shortest amount of speaking time at eight minutes and 52 seconds, per CNN, Williamson dominated a Drudge poll as over 47 percent of viewers declared her the winner of the debate. The author was all smiles as she spoke to reporters afterward

The graphic above shows the change in Google Trends data on most searched candidates before the debate.
As soon as the debate started Williamson became the most-searched in 49 states. The only state she didn't dominate was Montana, where Bullock is governor
Slide me

The graphic above shows the change in Google Trends data on most searched candidates before and during the debate. Before the debate Sanders, Warren, Williamson, Bullock and Klobuchar split the map, but as soon as it started Williamson became the most-searched in 49 states. The only state she didn't dominate was Montana, where Bullock is governor

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate. On the stage from left to right are: Marianne Williamson, Tim Ryan, Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Beto O'Rourke, John Hickenlooper, John Delaney and Steve Bullock

Williamson and nine other presidential hopefuls fought to stand out over the course of the three-hour showdown - the first half of the party's second debate. On the stage from left to right are: Marianne Williamson, Tim Ryan, Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Beto O'Rourke, John Hickenlooper, John Delaney and Steve Bullock

There were very few breakout moments across the debate as candidates teetered between slamming Trump and attacking each other, unsure whether to spend their time onstage trying to win the primary contest or the 2020 general election.

Front-runner Elizabeth Warren, who dominated the first debate last month, gave another strong performance and took up the most air time at 18 minutes and 33 seconds. 

The Massachusetts senator and her closest competitor, Vermont Sen Bernie Sanders, shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms. 

They both came out on top with speaking time, Sanders trailing Warren at 17 minutes and 45 seconds, as CNN allowed candidates extra time to respond to direct attacks. 

Warren was declared the winner of the first debate but received little credit for it as she wasn't up against any top five candidates. 

This time her performance is expected to have more of an impact as she was sharing the stage with  

Analyst Bill Palmer picked Warren as his winner again this time, saying her performance will have more of an impact given that she was sharing the stage with Sanders and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg. 

Palmer felt that Sanders didn't do himself any favors.  

'Warren has been climbing in the polls over the past month, partly at Bernie's expense,' he wrote. 'Tonight was his chance to show that he could hang in there with Warren, and it simply did not happen. Bernie got in some good moments, and he didn't hurt himself tonight. But he needed a win, and he didn't get it.'

CNN Editor-at-Large Chris Cillizza disagreed, naming Sanders as one of his winners.  

'He came out feisty -- and stayed that way,' he wrote. 'Asked about former Maryland Rep. John Delaney's criticism of his health care plan, Sanders responded bluntly, 'You're wrong.' Questioned about his single-payer "Medicare for All" plan, Sanders snapped, "I wrote the damn bill." 

'Sure, Sanders probably came across to some people as irascible and scoldy. But for liberals looking for Sanders to stand up proudly and unapologetically for the need for huge structural change in our politics and our culture got exactly what they wanted. 

'And not for nothing, Sanders clearly outshone Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren in this debate.'

Front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren took up the most air time as they shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms

Front-runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren took up the most air time as they shared the majority of the attacks from fellow candidates seizing on their socialist platforms

Buttigieg was one of the steadiest candidates on the stage, but Palmer said he also didn't fare as well as he did in the first debate.

'He did well enough tonight, but he was hurt by not being on stage with [Kamala] Harris and [Joe] Biden,' he wrote. 

Cillizza agreed that Buttigieg played it safe, but praised his 'clear message: I am young, yes, but the older people on stage with me haven't fixed any of these problems, so it's time for something different.' 

The three moderate candidates who came in with the lowest poll numbers - former Maryland congressman John Delaney, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper and Ohio Rep Tim Ryan - appeared to have the same strategy of standing out by taking on Sanders and Warren.  

The plan backfired as they each made several of the same point and morphed into one voice. 

Delaney's only breakout moment came as he went head to head with Warren, who, as Palmer put it, 'steamrolled him to the point that it was almost comical'. 

Bullock was the most effective moderate on the stage, spending much of his 11 minutes of speaking time blasting 'wish-list economics' and pie-in-the-sky policies while touting his track record in GOP territory.  

'If moderates were looking for someone other than former Vice President Joe Biden to support in this primary, Bullock offered himself as a viable alternative,' Cillizza wrote. 

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows
O'Rourke and Klobuchar each spoke for just under 11 minutes

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows. They each spoke for just under 11 minutes

Both former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke and Minnesota Sen Amy Klobuchar came out swinging but failed to land any breakout blows. They each spoke for just under 11 minutes. 

Cillizza said of O'Rourke: 'While he was mildly more energetic than in the first debate, there were large swaths of the debate where he simply disappeared from the conversation. 

'And too many times when he did have a chance to speak, he sounded too rehearsed and wooden, a problem that plagued him in the first debate.  

Klobuchar, Cillizza says, appeared to be 'treading water in search of a moment or surge'. 

With night one down, all eyes are now on California Sen Kamala Harris and former Vice President Joe Biden - who should have plenty to say about Tuesday's debate.   

Marianne Williamson's greatest debate hits – including a 'Seinfeld' hat-tip and a YODEL

Only one other Democrat spoke less than new-age guru Marianne Williamson during the July 30, 2019 primary debate, but she made the most of her time, dominating online discussion afterward with quips, quotables – and even a yodel.

'DARK PSYCHIC FORCES'

Williamson warned against substituting policy intellectual discussions for emotional appeals to thwart President Trump's use of racially charged language:

'If you think any of this wonkiness is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country, then I'm afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days.'

SLAVERY'S 'EMOTIONAL TURBULENCE'

Williamson defended her recommendation to devote as much as $500 billion to paying reparations to the descendants of African slaves:

'People heal when there's some deep truth-telling. We need to recognize that when it comes to the economic gap between blacks and whites in America, it does come from a great injustice that has never been dealt with. That great injustice has had to do with the fact that there was 250 years of slavery followed by another hundred years of domestic terrorism.

'What makes me qualified to say $200 billion to $500 billion? I'll tell you what makes me qualified. If you did the math of the 40 acres and a mule, given that there was 4 million to 5 million slaves at the end of the Civil War, four to five -- and they were all promised 40 acres and a mule for every family of four, if you did the math today, it would be trillions of dollars. And I believe that anything less than $100 billion is an insult.

'And I believe that $200 billion to $500 billion is politically feasible today, because so many Americans realize there is an injustice that continues to form a toxicity underneath the surface, an emotional turbulence that only reparations will heal.'

A 'SEINFELD' MOMENT

Asked about gun violence, Williamson lumped it into a longer list of Democratic bugbears that she believes can be defeated by taking their money out of the American political system. She ended with a hat-tip to a 1997 episode of 'Seinfeld':

'The issue of gun safety, of course, is that the NRA has us in a chokehold, but so do the pharmaceutical companies, so do the health insurance companies, so do the fossil fuel companies, and so do the defense contractors, and none of this will change until we either pass a constitutional amendment or pass legislation that establishes public funding for federal campaigns.

'But for politicians, including my fellow candidates, who themselves have taken tens of thousands -- and in some cases, hundreds of thousands -- of dollars from these same corporate donors to think that they now have the moral authority to say we're going to take them on, I don't think the Democratic Party should be surprised that so many Americans believe – "Yada, yada, yada".'

THE YODEL

As Williamson schooled her opponents on how to avoid letting Republicans outmaneuver them on healthcare, her voice suddenly jumped octaves:

'I have to say, I'm normally way over there with Bernie and Elizabeth on this one,' she said. But an unexpected vocal tic made it sound like 'I'm normally way-ee-ay over there.'

KISD educator attends STEM conference on Google scholarship - Kilgore News Herald

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 10:01 PM PDT

A Kilgore ISD employee recently attended a national conference for computer science teachers and her trip was fully funded by a Google scholarship.

According to a KISD press release, Rachel Hooten, Instructional Technology Coordinator for KISD, attended Computer Science Teachers National Conference in Phoenix, Arizona July 7-10.

The conference was held to give educators and administrators a chance to learn, discuss, present and collaborate on hot topics, ideas, trends and needs for students in computer science, according to the press release.

"Thanks to a scholarship from Google, (Hooten) was able to attend the conference to research more about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and computer science opportunities available to be brought back to Kilgore ISD and the students of KISD. Google sponsored workshops on Coding, Algorithms, Applications of English Writing into Coding and Machine Learning just to name a few," the release read.

At the conference reception, Hooten gave a short speech about the importance of computer science education in her experience as a KISD educator.

"Sharing my experiences with computer science and teaching coding to students was an empowering moment for me," Hooten said.

"I will never forget the words of a young girl I taught to code, 'You have opened a door for me. A door that will never, ever, ever close.' How powerful is that? That is the power of computer science and that is what we can do for our students."

Internet of Things: Regulationa and Consumer Products - The National Law Review

Posted: 30 Jul 2019 02:31 PM PDT

IoT: International Framework

Technological Revolutions are quiet and astonishing. Step by step new technological applications are pushing existing paradigms and changing the way business is transacted by consumers, companies and in society. In the past, electricity and printing had a revolutionary role in social development, shifting all sectors of life. These days, the Internet of Things (IoT) is pivotal in creating quick, profound and quiet transformations.

According to the Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation of OCED:

The Internet of Things (IoT) could soon be as commonplace as electricity in the everyday lives of people in OECD countries. As such, it will play a fundamental role in economic and social development in ways that would have been challenging to predict as recently as two or three decades ago[1].

In 2008-2009, according to Cisco IBSG - Internet Business Solutions, there were more connected objects, such as smartphones, tablets and computers, than the world's population. Therefore, this period is considered the year that IoT was born[2]. In 2008, Rob Van Kranemburg published "The Internet of Things", which addresses a new paradigm in which objects produce information.

Supporting CISCO's statement, the chart below of Google Trends shows the period of time during which popularity in searches on Google increased. In the last 5 years, IoT has sharply rocketed as a very attractive subject in the general mind of the people on the internet[3]:

Compliance Risks Chart 1
Interest Overtime (2004-2019) As Search Item

Digging deeper we can see that IoT popularity is not only relevant to internet users or to some futuristic curiosity on Google, it is a real and concrete "combination of network connectivity, widespread sensor placement, and sophisticated data analysis techniques" which enables "applications to aggregate and act on large amounts of data generated by IoT devices in homes, public spaces, industry and the natural world"[4].

The potential benefits of this kind of connectivity are immense: real-time monitoring and more accurate metrics, the ability to remotely control various actions, interconnectivity and automation, plus the ease of handling a variety of devices that can be centralized on just one smartphone. Nonetheless, this technological avalanche also brings risks and vulnerabilities to users, such as increased vigilance over our habits, exposure of our personal data, hacking vulnerabilities, global or cascading failures, among others.

In the last two years, a set of supporting policy actions have been adopted by the European Commission to accelerate the take-up of IoT and to unleash its potential in Europe for the benefit of European citizens and businesses[5]. These policy actions and statements are not only a guess or shallow forecast, they are a serious result of data and market analysis that came from several studies which found impressive numbers such as 11 billion connected 'things' in 2018[6]. This could be as many as 20 billion connections by 2020[7], about 6 billion of which will be in Europe[8]. Of these, 60-65% are consumer devices.

According to the Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI) more than 65% of businesses are expected to use IoT products by 2020, compared to 30% in 2017. Europe accounts for more than a third of global Industrial IoT investments by 2020. The market is expected to grow at an impressive average annual rate of 22%. Reaching a value of €287 billion in 2020, Industrial IoT is Europe's largest IoT market[9].

Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges

The Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI), an Agency of the Netherland's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and part of the development cooperation effort of the foreign relations of the Netherlands conducted research on the IoT in Europe in January 2019. It concluded:

The European market for Internet of Things (IoT) solutions is growing. Western and Northern Europe are especially promising. Both consumer and business IoT offer opportunities, but specialisation may give you a competitive advantage. The home, health and finance sectors are front runners. National and European initiatives are working to stimulate the roll-out of Industrial IoT solutions and lower barriers. The shortage of skilled specialists continues to drive outsourcing[10].

Apart from an advantageous and "smart" business opportunity, IoT can facilitate innovation in the private sector supporting a wide range of innovative businesses, not only raising the productivity level but increasing the accountability and responsiveness of companies and its employees, improving the client confidence.

Thus, IoT can work to facilitate Private Sector Innovation by so-called industrial Internet, Next Production Revolution (NPR)[11], autonomous machines and big data[12] and automotive industry[13]. On the other hand, innovative Public Sector Delivery with IoT applications could provide smart cities[14], smart governments, smart street lighting[15] and traffic flow optimization[16], innovation in healthcare practice and delivery[17]. IoT technologies are, therefore, expected to play a major role in improving the management of transport, energy use, water services, education, employment, health, crime prevention, by making society more efficient, innovative, safe, sustainable, and inclusive[18].

Regardless of all the benefits, there are many challenges and risks associated with IoT digital security, such as cyber attacks, digital incidents and privacy challenges. Furthermore, bad outcomes can happen causing physical consequences in case of the wrongdoing of autonomous vehicles, health care tools or industrial machines.

The Vision of IoT in 2020

First of all, the 2020 scenario might be approached by a combination of the Cloud and Big Data. Nowadays the hyperconnectivity[19] of society drives IoT to be "The Next Big Thing" in business. According to OECD this next big thing will be related to "a sophisticated industry ecosystem consisting of vendors (providing components), suppliers (creating solutions), service providers, and enterprise users in all sectors of the economy" that will be "measured in billions of Euro in Europe alone, and that will extend across the world too"[20].

Could expectations be too high? Maybe not, because of the following points: I) the centrality of IoT in the upcoming years is corroborated by the sheer number of connections that are expected to be in place by 2020; II) IoT ecosystem will have grown to encompass not only the traditional supply-side actors, but also a rising number of businesses and organizations serving and using  IoT; III) hyper-connected society will be an established reality by 2020, as most of the "things" that can be connected, will be by then.

In 2018, the World Economic Forum (WEF) published a study considering initiatives on the future of production. Essentially, it gives an insight into: I) Solution-driven: technology can tackle and solve challenges that have previously been insurmountable; ii) Human-centric: technology can unlock human potential by unleashing creativity, innovation and productivity in new ways; iii) Sustainable: technology can promote sound production processes that minimize negative environmental impact, conserve energy and resources and enable carbon neutrality; iv) Inclusive: employees, companies and countries at different stages of development benefit from Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies and the transformation of production systems[21].

One of its conclusions is that in the coming years, the IoT market is expected to grow across Europe. Most of the front runners are Western European countries, which have traditionally invested more in IT. And together, six countries make up more than 75% of the European IoT market, this makes them especially promising target markets for 2020.

Market Size in Europe
Chart 2. IoT Market Size in Europe

Further, apart from the geographic localization of the opportunities arising, to have a real and concrete overview it is important to be aware of the market size and 2020 forecast by sector. By 2020, industrial IoT is predicted to consist of:

  • 60% cross-industry devices - used in multiple industries, mainly to save costs;
  • 40% vertical-specific devices - used in a specific industry to improve efficiency/accuracy.
  •  
  • Industrial IoT also offers good opportunities, as the average spending per device is much higher in this sector. This makes total spending on consumer and industrial IoT about equal by 2020[22].

 

Compliance and Risks Chart 3
Chart 3: IoT Market Size Per Sector

Based on the US Dollar: Euro exchange rates in October 2018, the global average spending on IoT devices is expected to be:

  • €102 per consumer device;
  • €114 per cross-industry business device;
  • €239 per vertical-specific business device.

Finally, electronic sensors are now everywhere - in smartphones, cars, home electronic systems, healthcare devices, fitness monitors and in the workplace. It has been estimated that, by 2020, over 200 billion sensor devices will be inter-connected, creating a market size that, by 2025, will be between $2.7 trillion and $3 trillion a year[23].

At the same time, the market opportunity will bring regulatory challenges. The next section of this report will analyze by specific studies the impact of regulatory requirements on IoT devices and deployment.


[1]  OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 5. Available here.

[2] MANCINI, Monica. Internet das Coisas: História, Conceitos, Aplicações e Desafios. Available here. 

[3] Interest over time. Numbers represent search interest relative to the highest point on the chart for the given region and time. A value of 100 is the peak popularity for the term. A value of 50 means that the term is half as popular. A score of 0 means there was not enough data for this term. The information is available here.

[4] Idem, p. 5.

[5] European Commission. Digital Single Market. Policies: Internet of Things. Available here.

[6] Gartner, Inc. Press Release. Gartner Says 8.4 Billion Connected "Things" Will Be in Use in 2017, Up 31 Percent From 2016. February 2017. Available here.

[7] Idem, Leading the IoT. Gartner Insights on How to Lead in a Connected World. 2017. P. 2.

[8] European Commission. Definition of a Research and Innovation Policy Leveraging Cloud Computing and IoT Combination. FINAL REPORT. A study prepared for the European Commission. DG Communications Networks, Content & Technology. Digital Agenda for Europe. Available here.

[9] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[10] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[11] (NPR) entails a confluence of technologies ranging from a variety of digital technologies (e.g. 3D printing, the Internet of Things [IoT] and advanced robotics) to new materials (e.g. bio- or nano-based) to new processes (e.g. data-driven production, artificial intelligence [AI] and synthetic biology). The Next Production Revolution. A Report to G20. OECD, 2017. Available here.

[12] Autonomous machines and the use of big data are increasingly present in agriculture. Robots can now sort plants based on optical recognition, harvest lettuce and recognise rotten apples. Idem, Ibidem.

[13] The automotive industry is one of the sectors most affected by interconnectivity and enhanced efficiency in both production and operation of vehicles. Idem, Ibidem.

[14] "Smart city plans explore the ability to process huge masses of data coming from devices such as video cameras, parking sensors and air-quality monitors to help local governments achieve goals in terms of increased public safety, improved environment and better quality of life. In: OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 16.

[15]"Dublin (Ireland), Oslo (Norway) and Chattanooga, Tennessee in the United States have started to use smart street lighting systems.29 Often triggered by replacing municipal lighting with LED solutions to save on energy costs, smart street lighting can offer combined savings of up to USD 100 per streetlight per year". Idem, Ibidem.

[16]"The SCOOT system developed by Transport for London uses data on road usage with real-time control of traffic lights in the city to deliver on average a 12% improvement in traffic flow. Other large cities, like Beijing, São Paulo, Toronto or Preston have introduced SCOOT". Idem, Ibidem.

[17]"Smaller sensors, smartphone assisted readouts, big data analysis and continuous remote monitoring can enable new ways of managing care. Such a digital health feedback system includes wearable and that work together to gather information about medication-taking, activity and rest patterns. Idem. p.15.

[18] UN General Assembly, Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, A/HRC/32/38 (2016), P.12.

[19] A term invented by Canadian social scientists Anabel Quan-Haase and Barry Wellman, it refers to the use of multiple means of communication, such as email, instant messaging, telephone, face-to-face contact and Web 2.0 information services.

[20] OCDE. Committee on Digital Economy Policy of Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation. The Internet of Things: Seizing the Benefits and Addressing the Challenges. Background Report for Ministerial Panel 2.2. English Version. 24 May 2016. P. 24.

[21] World Economic Forum. Insight Report. Readiness for the Future of Production. Report 2018. Available here.

[22] Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Centre for the Promotion of Imports (CBI). January 2019. Available here.

[23] Russo et al. Exploring regulations and scope of the Internet of Things in contemporary companies: a first literature analysis. Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, 2015, P. 5.

Copyright © 2019 Compliance and Risks Ltd.

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