Sunday, July 14, 2019

“Google claims compliance with global tax rules, backs push for international standard - ZDNet” plus 2 more

“Google claims compliance with global tax rules, backs push for international standard - ZDNet” plus 2 more


Google claims compliance with global tax rules, backs push for international standard - ZDNet

Posted: 28 Jun 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Google has said that despite concerns about where the search engine giant pays taxes, it's on-the-whole paying what it should, where it should.

The company said its overall global tax rate has been over 23% for the past 10 years, which it said was in line with the 23.7% average statutory rate across the member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

"Most of these taxes are due in the United States, where our business originated, and where most of our products and services are developed," Google said in a blog post. "The rest we paid in the roughly fifty countries around the world where we have offices helping to sell our services."

Going to bat for its peers, Google said other US companies pay most of their corporate taxes in the US, "just as German, British, French, and Japanese firms pay most of their corporate taxes in their home countries".

See also: Australia wonders how to tax companies cashing in on user-generated content  

The post, penned by Google VP of government affairs and public policy Karan Bhatia, continues by saying the company supports the movement toward a new international framework for how multinational companies are taxed.

"Corporate income tax is an important way companies contribute to the countries and communities where they do business, and we would like to see a tax environment that people find reasonable and appropriate," she wrote.

The post follows a meeting by a group of 20 global finance leaders that agreed to plans that would see technology giants such as Facebook and Google pay more taxes.

At the time, it was reported that in a draft communique, G20 members agreed to implement common rules to close international loopholes that see multinationals able to book profits offshore in locations where the tax rate is low to avoid local taxation requirements.

The new rules that would come into place next year would mean higher tax burdens for large multinational firms.

See also: Trump says Google peddles fake news. The horror of it

"The United States, Germany, and other countries have put forward new proposals for modernizing tax rules, with more taxes paid in countries where products and services are consumed," Google's post continued.

"We hope governments can develop a consensus around a new framework for fair taxation, giving companies operating around the world clear rules that promote a sensible business investment."

Google, however, is concerned that without a "comprehensive and multilateral agreement", foreign firms may have "discriminatory unilateral taxes" placed upon them.

"Indeed, we already see such problems in some of the specific proposals that have been put forward," Google said. "That kind of race to the bottom would create new barriers to trade, slow cross-border investment, and hamper economic growth."

Saying a global approach will restore confidence in the international tax system and promote more cross-border trade and investment, Google said it strongly supports the OECD's work to develop new tax principles.

"We call on governments and companies to work together to accelerate this reform and forge a new, lasting, and global agreement," the post concluded.

RELATED COVERAGE

Top 10: The world's favorite cakes revealed - BakeryAndSnacks.com

Posted: 12 Jul 2019 02:55 AM PDT

Leisure has analysed the cakes each country is searching for the most to reveal which cake is the world's favourite. The UK range cooker producer used Google's Keyword Planner (searching all languages) to establish the average monthly search volume in each country for 249 popular cakes.

Cake

Most searched

Topping the bill is chocolate cake, pinging up almost 400,000 searches each month.

Red Velvet takes second place with over 320,000 monthly searches across the globe, with Carrot cake taking up third position with over 300,000 searches.

There is a big gap to the next two contenders in the top five countdown.

Banana comes in fourth with just over 190,000 monthly searches and Pineapple Upside Down cake – particularly popular in both the States and Russia – grabs fifth position with just shy on 170,000 monthly searches globally.

Black Forest comes in sixth, Ice Cream in seventh and Bundt cake in eighth position.

The UK ranks Lemon Drizzle cake as their top choice overall – surprisingly outranking traditional favorites like Victoria sponge (in 10th​ place).

Research showed the lemon soaked sponge is searched for over 11,000 times a month in the British Isles and more than 120,000 times across the globe, ranking it in ninth place overall for total number of monthly searches worldwide.

Most countries

Chocolate again stole first position as the most searched for cake in 81 countries.

Red Velvet is second with 43 countries. It is also crowned Europe's go-to treat with 14 Member States opting for this cake as their favorite.

Google extends Chrome ad blocking to global markets on July 9 - Marketing Land

Posted: 03 Jul 2019 12:00 AM PDT

On February 2018, Google implemented ad filtering for "annoying" and intrusive ads in Chrome in North America and Europe. This had been pre-announced in 2017 and was intended to compel publishers to adopt advertising standards established by the Coalition for Better Ads

Chrome has 64% of global browser market. The industry group was created in response to the rise of consumer ad-blocking. Now Chrome's bad-ads filtering is going global, with a rollout to markets beyond North America and Europe on July 8. Google Chrome has a roughly 64% global browser market share.

We previously published an in-depth discussion of Chrome ad blocking and what it means for publishers and marketers (See FAQ: Google Chrome ad blocking is here. Everything you need to know).

The 12 ad formats deemed particularly annoying based on the Coalition for Better Ads survey data. Source: Coalition for Better Ads

In brief, sites that feature any of the four desktop or eight mobile ad categories banned under the Better Ads Standards (above), could see those units, or potentially all ads on their sites, blocked. Annoying formats include pop-ups, auto-play video ads with sound, prestitial ads, flashing/animated ads, large sticky ads and full-screen scrollover ads, among others.

Ads don't display on sites with failing grades. When a user visits a site that has failed Better Ad Standards, Chrome's filter will block ads from rendering on the page. Users will then see a message indicating ads have been blocked but will have the ability to "allow ads on this site."

The global rollout of Chrome "ad blocking" comes at a time when Google engineers are contemplating controversial changes to browser extension APIs, which could disable most third-party ad blockers and privacy extensions. Google appeared to reverse course, although the status of the changes remains uncertain.

Why we should care. The vast majority of North American and European publisher sites pass the Better Ad Standards test, so the impact on users and publisher ad revenues has been minimal. That's less certain in other markets, including Asia where consumer ad blocking is currently highest in the world — 50% according to one survey.



About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes a personal blog, Screenwerk, about connecting the dots between digital media and real-world consumer behavior. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.


“Google claims compliance with global tax rules, backs push for international standard - ZDNet” plus 2 more


Google claims compliance with global tax rules, backs push for international standard - ZDNet

Posted: 28 Jun 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Google has said that despite concerns about where the search engine giant pays taxes, it's on-the-whole paying what it should, where it should.

The company said its overall global tax rate has been over 23% for the past 10 years, which it said was in line with the 23.7% average statutory rate across the member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

"Most of these taxes are due in the United States, where our business originated, and where most of our products and services are developed," Google said in a blog post. "The rest we paid in the roughly fifty countries around the world where we have offices helping to sell our services."

Going to bat for its peers, Google said other US companies pay most of their corporate taxes in the US, "just as German, British, French, and Japanese firms pay most of their corporate taxes in their home countries".

See also: Australia wonders how to tax companies cashing in on user-generated content  

The post, penned by Google VP of government affairs and public policy Karan Bhatia, continues by saying the company supports the movement toward a new international framework for how multinational companies are taxed.

"Corporate income tax is an important way companies contribute to the countries and communities where they do business, and we would like to see a tax environment that people find reasonable and appropriate," she wrote.

The post follows a meeting by a group of 20 global finance leaders that agreed to plans that would see technology giants such as Facebook and Google pay more taxes.

At the time, it was reported that in a draft communique, G20 members agreed to implement common rules to close international loopholes that see multinationals able to book profits offshore in locations where the tax rate is low to avoid local taxation requirements.

The new rules that would come into place next year would mean higher tax burdens for large multinational firms.

See also: Trump says Google peddles fake news. The horror of it

"The United States, Germany, and other countries have put forward new proposals for modernizing tax rules, with more taxes paid in countries where products and services are consumed," Google's post continued.

"We hope governments can develop a consensus around a new framework for fair taxation, giving companies operating around the world clear rules that promote a sensible business investment."

Google, however, is concerned that without a "comprehensive and multilateral agreement", foreign firms may have "discriminatory unilateral taxes" placed upon them.

"Indeed, we already see such problems in some of the specific proposals that have been put forward," Google said. "That kind of race to the bottom would create new barriers to trade, slow cross-border investment, and hamper economic growth."

Saying a global approach will restore confidence in the international tax system and promote more cross-border trade and investment, Google said it strongly supports the OECD's work to develop new tax principles.

"We call on governments and companies to work together to accelerate this reform and forge a new, lasting, and global agreement," the post concluded.

RELATED COVERAGE

Top 10: The world's favorite cakes revealed - BakeryAndSnacks.com

Posted: 12 Jul 2019 02:55 AM PDT

Leisure has analysed the cakes each country is searching for the most to reveal which cake is the world's favourite. The UK range cooker producer used Google's Keyword Planner (searching all languages) to establish the average monthly search volume in each country for 249 popular cakes.

Cake

Most searched

Topping the bill is chocolate cake, pinging up almost 400,000 searches each month.

Red Velvet takes second place with over 320,000 monthly searches across the globe, with Carrot cake taking up third position with over 300,000 searches.

There is a big gap to the next two contenders in the top five countdown.

Banana comes in fourth with just over 190,000 monthly searches and Pineapple Upside Down cake – particularly popular in both the States and Russia – grabs fifth position with just shy on 170,000 monthly searches globally.

Black Forest comes in sixth, Ice Cream in seventh and Bundt cake in eighth position.

The UK ranks Lemon Drizzle cake as their top choice overall – surprisingly outranking traditional favorites like Victoria sponge (in 10th​ place).

Research showed the lemon soaked sponge is searched for over 11,000 times a month in the British Isles and more than 120,000 times across the globe, ranking it in ninth place overall for total number of monthly searches worldwide.

Most countries

Chocolate again stole first position as the most searched for cake in 81 countries.

Red Velvet is second with 43 countries. It is also crowned Europe's go-to treat with 14 Member States opting for this cake as their favorite.

Google extends Chrome ad blocking to global markets on July 9 - Marketing Land

Posted: 03 Jul 2019 12:00 AM PDT

On February 2018, Google implemented ad filtering for "annoying" and intrusive ads in Chrome in North America and Europe. This had been pre-announced in 2017 and was intended to compel publishers to adopt advertising standards established by the Coalition for Better Ads

Chrome has 64% of global browser market. The industry group was created in response to the rise of consumer ad-blocking. Now Chrome's bad-ads filtering is going global, with a rollout to markets beyond North America and Europe on July 8. Google Chrome has a roughly 64% global browser market share.

We previously published an in-depth discussion of Chrome ad blocking and what it means for publishers and marketers (See FAQ: Google Chrome ad blocking is here. Everything you need to know).

The 12 ad formats deemed particularly annoying based on the Coalition for Better Ads survey data. Source: Coalition for Better Ads

In brief, sites that feature any of the four desktop or eight mobile ad categories banned under the Better Ads Standards (above), could see those units, or potentially all ads on their sites, blocked. Annoying formats include pop-ups, auto-play video ads with sound, prestitial ads, flashing/animated ads, large sticky ads and full-screen scrollover ads, among others.

Ads don't display on sites with failing grades. When a user visits a site that has failed Better Ad Standards, Chrome's filter will block ads from rendering on the page. Users will then see a message indicating ads have been blocked but will have the ability to "allow ads on this site."

The global rollout of Chrome "ad blocking" comes at a time when Google engineers are contemplating controversial changes to browser extension APIs, which could disable most third-party ad blockers and privacy extensions. Google appeared to reverse course, although the status of the changes remains uncertain.

Why we should care. The vast majority of North American and European publisher sites pass the Better Ad Standards test, so the impact on users and publisher ad revenues has been minimal. That's less certain in other markets, including Asia where consumer ad blocking is currently highest in the world — 50% according to one survey.



About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes a personal blog, Screenwerk, about connecting the dots between digital media and real-world consumer behavior. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.


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