Wednesday, June 12, 2019

“Google Trends gets integrated into Data Studio via free third-party app - Search Engine Land” plus 3 more

“Google Trends gets integrated into Data Studio via free third-party app - Search Engine Land” plus 3 more


Google Trends gets integrated into Data Studio via free third-party app - Search Engine Land

Posted: 11 Jun 2019 10:20 AM PDT

UK-based marketing firm StrategiQ has released a Google Trends connector for Data Studio. Initially developed for its own clients in July 2018, the now-free tool allows users to extract search trend information directly into their Data Studio reports.

Google_trends_data_studio_connector

Image sourced from StrategiQ.

How to get started. To get Google Trends information in your Data Studio reports, you'll need to do the following:

  1. Get the gtrends.app API. You can register for an API key by providing your email address (which StrategiQ says will be used to contact you if your use of the service causes issues). After inputting a keyword or phrase and region pair, the API will retrieve the data from the Google Trends UI and return it as JSON.
  2. Add the Data Studio connector. You'll first need to add a data source for every keyword and region pair you want data on. Then, you'll need to configure that data source using your API key and the desired keyword/region combo.

Why we should care. Google Trends data has long been a resource for gauging keyword traffic, content planning and assessing daily as well as long term search trends. This solution helps to consolidate that valuable information onto Data Studio, where you can create custom reports to share with clients and colleagues. It may also save you the frustration of flipping back and forth between the Trends data being referenced and the platform you're working on.

FWIW. Google has yet to release an official integration for Trends and Data Studio. Since this is a free, third-party offering, StrategiQ does not provide a service-level agreement or guarantee a minimum uptime. It also reserves the right to block abuse of the API without formal notice. And, StrategiQ requests that users attribute the company if they use the connector for research purposes.



About The Author

George Nguyen is an Associate Editor at Third Door Media. His background is in content marketing, journalism, and storytelling.

Abortion searches reach record highs: The topic was a top Google trend twice last month - Waxahachie Daily Light

Posted: 11 Jun 2019 07:51 AM PDT

More than a dozen states this year passed laws to either restrict or expand access to abortion, with a flurry of activity happening within the past few weeks alone.

Reaction to the changes has dominated cable news networks and social media platforms. It also seemingly spurred record-breaking Google searches for words related to abortion.

On May 14, the Alabama Senate passed a bill banning nearly all abortions. The same day, more than a half million people searched the phrase "Alabama abortion law" on Google — the fourth-highest query of the day behind "Tim Conway," "the Warriors," and "NBA draft lottery," according to the internet search engine's statistics.

The next day, when Alabama's governor signed the bill, a single word — "abortion" — ranked No. 2 for trending searches in America with more than 200,000 hits, according to Google Trends.

Owned by the search engine for which it's named, Google Trends uses "an unbiased sample" of its users' search data to provide snapshots of queries dating back as far as 2004.

The site displays the number of hits for top search terms each day. It also tracks search terms' popularity over time based on an index of 1-100. Not provided are most of the demographics behind the searches. So it's impossible to speculate on who is fueling the spike in abortion-related queries or why.

But Google Trends does show where searches originated. And Southern states generally ranked on top for abortion-related searches.

The phrase "abortion clinic near me," for example, reached an all-time high in May. As of June 6, most of the searches came from Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and South Carolina. Searches for the phrase and its plural counterpart "abortion clinics near me" have both increased overall in recent years.

Texas ranked second, behind only the 100-index ranking given to Georgia, with a score of 91 in online searches for "pregnancy center near me."

The Lone Star State was also tied for 10th in the ranking of searches on the general topic of abortion by a state or district with an 86-index score, matching Michigan and Virginia.

The District of Columbia led the group with a perfect 100-index score, followed by Mississippi (97) and Georgia (89). Louisiana, Indiana and Kentucky all tallied an 88, while Maryland, West Virginia and Alabama recorded an 87.

The data found that 52 percent of abortion-related Google searches in Texas were related to finding a "pregnancy center near me," while the other 48 percent were for general abortion topics or "abortion clinics near me."

Searches related to the topic of abortion also reached a record high last month but showed little variation in the location of those who Google it.

"The abortion issue is in many ways unique among social issues in how long it has been the focus of attention. It has been at the forefront of many national and local-level conversations for decades," said Ziad Munson, an associate professor of sociology at Lehigh University. "This sustained attention does wax and wane a little bit, and in the last few months there's been a lot more attention than in some previous periods."

Searches spike but abortions fall

The abortion rate dropped to a decade low in 2015, the most recent year for which data is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC reported 11.8 abortions per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44 — a 26 percent decline from 2006.

The fertility rate among same-aged women in 2015, by comparison, was 62.5 births per 1,000.

Despite this, searches for "pregnancy care center near me" in the past year are significantly lower than the number of searches for "abortion clinic near me." The top number of searches for the former came from Georgia, Texas, Ohio, Florida and North Carolina.

That could be because many women who discover pregnancy care centers find them by searching information about pregnancy symptoms, pregnancy tests or ultrasounds, said Andrea Trudden, director of communications and marketing for Heartbeat International, a network of pregnancy resource centers in the United States.

Google recently changed its policy for advertisements related to the topic.

Due to confusion over pregnancy care centers using misleading language in advertisements, Google now automatically generates "in-ad disclosures" for certified advertisers saying they either do or do not provide abortions.

While abortion-related Google searches spiked, some pregnancy-related queries are on the decline. "Am I pregnant" has trailed off since its peak in August 2012. "Pregnancy symptoms" reached its peak 13 months earlier but has tanked since then. Mississippi-based internet users ranked the No. 1 source for both those search terms, according to Google Trends.

Mississippi also generated the highest number of searches for "abortion clinic" in May — the same month a federal judge temporarily blocked the state's new bill banning abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

Other top states for that search term were Georgia, which recently passed a similar law, as well as Alabama and South Carolina.

Searches for "Planned Parenthood near me" also reached an all-time high in December. The nonprofit women's health care organization provides women's health care and abortions in clinics across the country and is well-known for its lobbying efforts for abortion access. The second-highest peak for that search term was last month.

At the same time, searches for "how to get an abortion," reached a 90-day peak on May 16, as did searches for "abortion pill." Illinois ranked No. 1 for searches on "how to get an abortion" made between January 1 and the end of May.

Some of the Google queries might reflect confusion about recent legislation and what it makes for women seeking to terminate a pregnancy. For example, searches for "where abortion is legal" reached a 15-year peak last month.

"It's certainly an increased fear and anxiety we've been noticing," said Alison Dreith, deputy director of the Hope Women's Clinic, an abortion provider in Granite City, Illinois.

The clinic is near the Illinois-Missouri border — just 10 miles from St. Louis — and serves women from both states, as well as those coming from elsewhere in the country.

Missouri lawmakers last month banned abortions after eight weeks, and the state's only abortion provider is operating only thanks to a judge's order. Illinois, meanwhile, passed a law protecting abortion rights.

"We've been fielding a lot more calls than we normally do and getting messages on social media saying, 'I made my appointment before these bans, can I still get my procedure?'" Dreith said. "They are seeing these headlines and news and worried about how that affects their procedure."

____

Additional reporting by Travis M. Smith/Daily Light.

Mary Meeker's 2019 Internet Trends report spotlights health care digitization - ZDNet

Posted: 11 Jun 2019 12:07 PM PDT

Driven by consumer demand, the health care sector in the US is steadily digitizing, according to Mary Meeker's annual Internet Trends report. While this trend may be most evident in the use of consumer tools, such as health wearables, digitization is underway across the entire healthcare ecosystem -- hospital administrators are updating their record-keeping systems, researchers have access to troves of new digital data and doctors are offering more data-driven, personalized forms of care. 

Health wearables: Fitbit's second act: Can the original fitness band maker stage a comeback with healthcare?  |  Microsoft patent shows wearable band with haptic feedback  |  Why your smartwatch and wearable devices are the next big privacy nightmare

Meeker, the Bond Capital founder and former Kleiner Perkins general partner, has tracked internet statistics and technology trends since 1995. The digitization of the health care industry, she notes, correlates with the rising cost of health care in the US -- a looming issue for consumers and the government. In the US, consumers not only have to contend with relatively high costs, compared to the rest of the world, but also relatively poor outcomes, according to some metrics.

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In this context, patients are increasingly using a range of digital health tools to become more engaged in health care decision-making. Compared with 2015, a larger portion of Americans now use online health information, online provider reviews, mobile health tracking, wearables and live video telemedicine.

Digital services that give patients faster access to care providers are also growing in popularity.  The number of patients that use the online platform ZocDoc to book appointments has grown steadily since 2012. The report also spotlighted the two-year-old startup Solv, which enables patients to book same-day appointments and no-wait urgent care.

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The number of hospitals embracing telemedicine is also growing -- nearly 80 percent of hospitals in the US have implemented the service. Meanwhile, tools like Doximity, a doctor social network, help improve physician communications and expands their knowledge base, making it more likely that patients can see the right specialist or get the specific care they need.

Membership is also up for Clover Health, a Medicare Advantage insurer that combines technology and preventive care to lower costs and increase the quality of life for patients. Correspondingly, Medicare Advantage enrollment is also on the rise.

On the administrative side of the business, the use of electronic health records (EHR) is nearing 100 percent adoption in the US. Still, their usage is in early innings, the report says. It highlights survey data showing around two-thirds of physicians are still looking for interoperability from EHR systems. Doctors are also asking for predictive analytics features, as well as the integration of financial and cost data.

ehr.png

Digital Health Management tools like Oscar Health are also taking off, giving hospitals and doctors' offices the opportunity to replace legacy systems. Additionally, health networks are increasingly using collaboration tools to align provider teams across organizations.

Innovation in Medicine: Tele-Medicine station could cut ER visits, save on healthcare costs   |  Terminal patient learns he's going to die from a robot doctor  |  This medical pioneer trains digital doctors with AR and VR

The health care industry is also changing thanks to the proliferation of health data. Millions of Americans each year undergo genomics testing, creating a growing base of personal genetic data.

Internet leaders are poised to capture troves of digitized health care data, the report stresses. Consumers increasingly trust companies like Google and Amazon with their health data, and these companies are capitalizing on that trust. For instance, Apple's ResearchKit helps medical researchers collect data for clinical studies, while Google's DeepMind is using AI to unlock insights for practitioners. Last year, Amazon bought the internet pharmacy start-up PillPack.

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Google searches on 'abortion' reach record highs - News - MetroWest Daily News

Posted: 08 Jun 2019 09:01 PM PDT

More than a dozen states this year have passed laws to either restrict or expand access to abortion, with a flurry of activity happening within the past few weeks alone.

Reaction to the changes has dominated cable news networks and social media platforms. It also seemingly spurred record-breaking Google searches for words related to abortion.

On May 14, the Alabama Senate passed a bill banning nearly all abortions. That same day, more than a half-million people searched the phrase "Alabama abortion law" on Google — the fourth-highest query of the day behind "Tim Conway," "the Warriors" and "NBA draft lottery," according to the internet search engine's statistics.

The next day, when Alabama's governor signed the bill, a single word — "abortion" — ranked No. 2 for trending searches in America with more than 200,000 hits, according to Google Trends.

Owned by the search engine for which it's named, Google Trends uses "an unbiased sample" of its users' search data to provide snapshots of queries dating back as far as 2004.

The site displays the number of hits for top search terms each day. It also tracks search terms' popularity over time based on an index of 1-100. Not provided are most of the demographics behind the searches. So it's impossible to speculate on who is fueling the spike in abortion-related queries or why.

But Google Trends does show where searches originated. And Southern states generally ranked on top for abortion-related searches.

The phrase "abortion clinic near me," for example, reached an all-time high in May. As of Thursday, most of the searches came from Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and South Carolina. Searches for the phrase and its plural counterpart "abortion clinics near me" have both increased overall in recent years.

Searches related to the topic of abortion also reached a record high last month but showed little variation in the location of those who Google it.

"The abortion issue is in many ways unique among social issues in how long it has been the focus of attention. It has been at the forefront of many national and local-level conversations for decades," said Ziad Munson, an associate professor of sociology at Lehigh University. "This sustained attention does wax and wane a little bit, and in the last few months there's been a lot more attention than in some previous periods."

Searches spike, abortions decline

The abortion rate dropped to a decade low in 2015, the most recent year for which data is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC reported 11.8 abortions per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44 — a 26 percent decline from 2006.

The fertility rate among same-aged women in 2015, by comparison, was 62.5 births per 1,000.

Despite this, searches for "pregnancy care center near me" in the past year are significantly lower than the number of searches for "abortion clinic near me." The top number of searches for the former came from Georgia, Texas, Ohio, Florida and North Carolina.

That could be because many women who discover pregnancy care centers find them by searching information about pregnancy symptoms, pregnancy tests or ultrasounds, said Andrea Trudden, director of communications and marketing for Heartbeat International, a network of pregnancy resource centers in the United States.

Google recently changed its policy for advertisements related to the topic.

Due to confusion over pregnancy care centers using misleading language in advertisements, Google now automatically generates "in-ad disclosures" for certified advertisers saying they either do or do not provide abortions.

While abortion-related Google searches spiked, some pregnancy-related queries are on the decline. "Am I pregnant" has trailed off since its peak in August 2012. "Pregnancy symptoms" reached its peak 13 months earlier but has tanked since then. Mississippi-based internet users ranked the No. 1 source for both those search terms, according to Google Trends.

Mississippi also generated the highest number of searches for "abortion clinic" in May — the same month a federal judge temporarily blocked the state's new bill banning abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

Other top states for that search term were Georgia, which recently passed a similar law, as well as Alabama and South Carolina.

Searches for "Planned Parenthood near me" also reached an all-time high in December. The nonprofit women's health care organization provides women's health care and abortions in clinics across the country and is well-known for its lobbying efforts for abortion access. The second-highest peak for that search term was last month.

At the same time, searches for "how to get an abortion," reached a 90-day peak on May 16, as did searches for "abortion pill." Illinois ranked No. 1 for searches on "how to get an abortion" made between January 1 and the end of May.

Some of the Google queries might reflect confusion about recent legislation and what it means for women seeking to terminate a pregnancy. For example, searches for "where abortion is legal" reached a 15-year peak last month.

"It's certainly an increased fear and anxiety we've been noticing," said Alison Dreith, deputy director of the Hope Women's Clinic, an abortion provider in Granite City, Illinois.

The clinic is near the Illinois-Missouri border — just 10 miles from St. Louis — and serves women from both states, as well as those coming from elsewhere in the country.

Missouri lawmakers last month banned abortions after eight weeks, and the state's only abortion provider is operating only thanks to a judge's order. Illinois, meanwhile, passed a law protecting abortion rights.

"We've been fielding a lot more calls than we normally do and getting messages on social media saying, 'I made my appointment before these bans, can I still get my procedure?'" Dreith said. "They are seeing these headlines and news and worried about how that affects their procedure."

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