Wednesday, June 12, 2019

“Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes - Search Engine Journal” plus 3 more

“Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes - Search Engine Journal” plus 3 more


Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes - Search Engine Journal

Posted: 31 May 2019 12:00 AM PDT

A new feature in Google Maps utilizes machine learning to recommend a restaurant's most popular dishes.

"Whether you're craving a tea cocktail in Brooklyn or sampling Pacific Rim cuisine in London, Google Maps now highlights a restaurant's most popular items on the menu, so you can place your order with confidence."

The feature's machine learning capabilities are powered by an algorithm that matches dish names with relevant photos and reviews.

Popular dishes are highlighted within the overview tab of restaurant listings. Simply search for a restaurant in Maps to find its top offerings.

Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes

Users can find additional information within the restaurant's menu tab, which will display photos and reviews for all dishes (as long as they've been provided by other Maps users).

Google emphasizes how, ultimately, this features was made possible thanks to a dedicated community of people contributing information to Google Maps.

"At the end of the day, this feature is made possible because of contributions from people around the world who want to help others using Google Maps. So if you want to pay it forward to the next diner, simply take a photo of your meal (before you've scarfed it down!) and add a dish name so others can know what's good on the menu."

Popular dishes are now live on Google Maps for Android and will be rolled out to iOS in the coming months.

More Resources

Google Maps is now using AI to highlight popular restaurant dishes - BGR

Posted: 30 May 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Continuing with a theme we touched on just a day ago, Google Maps has added yet another enhancement that moves the popular navigation app deeper into territory that doesn't really have much to do with helping direct you from Point A to Point B. In this case, Google has added a new feature to Maps that's live now on Android (and which is coming to the iOS version in "the coming months) and involves the app using AI to spotlight the most popular dishes at restaurants.

In a company blog post today, Google Maps product manager Ronnie Falcon explained that this new feature is an outgrowth of the robust amount of information Maps already provides when it comes to restaurants. Things like how to get there, reviews and ratings and an assortment of photos. "But as you scan the menu, you're probably wondering, 'What's good? Now Google Maps is making it easy to 'dish-cover' a restaurant's most crowd-pleasing meals with a new popular dishes feature."

Image Source: Google

Falcon explains that a machine learning algorithm matches dish names provided by Maps users with relevant photos and reviews. The result is a convenient arrangement of the most popular items from a particular restaurant, right at your fingertips within the app.

That means all you have to do is open Google Maps, search for a restaurant and you can instantly check out its most popular dishes in the restaurant's overview tab. You can then take a deeper look at the menu and tap on popular dishes to explore reviews and photos — again, all from within Maps.

Image Source: Google

As we mentioned yesterday in our post about Google Maps now showing speed limits and speed cameras in 40+ cameras, today's news continues a trend toward increasing and multi-faceted functionality within Google Maps. As Falcon explains, "From a redesigned Explore tab in Google Maps that helps you find things to do, group planning features that make it easier to coordinate with friends and family, and now popular dishes, Google Maps is helping you get out and enjoy the world."

Google Talking To US On Huawei's Behalf, Official Of Chinese Firm Says - NPR

Posted: 06 Jun 2019 09:15 PM PDT

Huawei employees wait for a shuttle bus at the company's campus on April 12 in Shenzhen, China. A senior Huawei official says Google is talking with the U.S. government on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Huawei employees wait for a shuttle bus at the company's campus on April 12 in Shenzhen, China. A senior Huawei official says Google is talking with the U.S. government on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant.

Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

Google is quietly assuming the role of Huawei emissary, according to a senior Huawei official, in effect negotiating with the Commerce Department on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant that has been blacklisted in the U.S.

The fates of Huawei and Google are intertwined. Huawei is a leader in creating next-generation wireless networks, and it's the world's No. 2 maker of smartphones. Google provides support for Android, the popular mobile operating system. The U.S. government ban against Huawei also blocks Google from giving security updates to millions of existing Huawei phones and from issuing Android licenses in the future. (Google is an NPR sponsor.)

In an interview this week with Huawei Chairman Liang Hua, NPR asked him how his company would resolve the problem of losing access to Google software.

"Google is a very responsible company. We have maintained very good cooperation with each other," Liang said through a translator at Huawei headquarters in Shenzhen, China. "We really look forward to productive results from the communication that Google is currently having with the Commerce Department."

When the Huawei ban first went into effect, and Google announced it would cut ties, there was an outcry. Days later, the Trump administration said it would postpone parts of the ban until August.

The outsize power of American tech giants is well-understood the world over. Huawei's Liang is now leaning on Google to influence the Commerce Department on his company's behalf.

"We really hope that there are possible remedies coming out of the communication between Google and the Commerce Department," he said. "We think that it is in the benefit of the consumers if they could work out a solution."

Last month, citing national security concerns, the Trump administration added Huawei to a list of banned entities. American companies — from mobile providers to chipmakers like Intel and Qualcomm — will not be allowed to do business with Huawei. That's because, according to U.S. officials, the company's technology could be used for surveillance. If a resolution isn't reached, Liang says, Huawei will have to build its own software, which would be "difficult."

Liang says he does not know the details of the talks.

In an email, a Google spokesperson said: "Like other U.S. companies, we're engaging with the Department of Commerce to ensure we're in full compliance with its requirements and temporary license. Our focus is protecting the security of Google users on the millions of existing Huawei handsets in the U.S. and around the world today and going forward."

The company declined to say whether its talks with the government have included directly or indirectly advocating for the ability to support future Huawei devices.

NPR interviewed several former senior officials at Commerce and the White House who are concerned that a private company, governed by its own self-interests, is advocating for a foreign partner that has been officially blacklisted for security concerns.

Eric Hirschhorn says turning Huawei into a bargaining chip in the U.S.-China trade war was a strategic mistake. "I spent a lot of time [trying] to make sure that national security and trade were kept separate," he said. Mixing the two "would have been unheard of."

Hirschhorn served in the Commerce Department during the Obama administration as an undersecretary for industry and security.

According to former Commerce officials, it's standard for companies to reach out to the department about their ability to do business abroad. But the foreign partner is often at the table, too, able to talk and be questioned.

Hirschhorn says the process changes once the U.S. government decides to take enforcement action – as it did last month when the U.S. banned Huawei. He says company financials should not be considered alongside national security decisions. And, he says, if Huawei gets what it wants, through Google's efforts, that sends a "very, very bad message" to people who break U.S. rules.

"If I know that my government or my powerful business partner can basically fix a ticket if I get one, I won't worry about speeding," Hirschhorn says.

The Commerce Department says it routinely responds to inquiries from companies about regulatory requirements. It says this is not new to this administration, and these discussions don't influence law enforcement actions.

NPR's Pallavi Gogoi contributed to this report.

20 Perfect Audiobooks To Listen To While Road-Tripping This Summer - BuzzFeed News

Posted: 06 Jun 2019 03:22 PM PDT

Three years after her husband, Devon, died in a car crash, Ashley Ryan still hasn't moved on. To help take her mind off things, her friends surprise her with a getaway to Catalina Cove, Louisiana, where — instead of a relaxing vacation — she finds her dead husband, very much alive. Tessa learns that Devon is suffering from amnesia and, though he doesn't remember their life together, the feelings they had for each other are still there. After the doctors recommend that Tessa keep the truth to herself, she and Devon fall in love again as strangers, giving her the second chance she never thought she'd get.

“Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes - Search Engine Journal” plus 3 more


Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes - Search Engine Journal

Posted: 31 May 2019 12:00 AM PDT

A new feature in Google Maps utilizes machine learning to recommend a restaurant's most popular dishes.

"Whether you're craving a tea cocktail in Brooklyn or sampling Pacific Rim cuisine in London, Google Maps now highlights a restaurant's most popular items on the menu, so you can place your order with confidence."

The feature's machine learning capabilities are powered by an algorithm that matches dish names with relevant photos and reviews.

Popular dishes are highlighted within the overview tab of restaurant listings. Simply search for a restaurant in Maps to find its top offerings.

Google Maps to Highlight a Restaurant’s Popular Dishes

Users can find additional information within the restaurant's menu tab, which will display photos and reviews for all dishes (as long as they've been provided by other Maps users).

Google emphasizes how, ultimately, this features was made possible thanks to a dedicated community of people contributing information to Google Maps.

"At the end of the day, this feature is made possible because of contributions from people around the world who want to help others using Google Maps. So if you want to pay it forward to the next diner, simply take a photo of your meal (before you've scarfed it down!) and add a dish name so others can know what's good on the menu."

Popular dishes are now live on Google Maps for Android and will be rolled out to iOS in the coming months.

More Resources

Google Maps is now using AI to highlight popular restaurant dishes - BGR

Posted: 30 May 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Continuing with a theme we touched on just a day ago, Google Maps has added yet another enhancement that moves the popular navigation app deeper into territory that doesn't really have much to do with helping direct you from Point A to Point B. In this case, Google has added a new feature to Maps that's live now on Android (and which is coming to the iOS version in "the coming months) and involves the app using AI to spotlight the most popular dishes at restaurants.

In a company blog post today, Google Maps product manager Ronnie Falcon explained that this new feature is an outgrowth of the robust amount of information Maps already provides when it comes to restaurants. Things like how to get there, reviews and ratings and an assortment of photos. "But as you scan the menu, you're probably wondering, 'What's good? Now Google Maps is making it easy to 'dish-cover' a restaurant's most crowd-pleasing meals with a new popular dishes feature."

Image Source: Google

Falcon explains that a machine learning algorithm matches dish names provided by Maps users with relevant photos and reviews. The result is a convenient arrangement of the most popular items from a particular restaurant, right at your fingertips within the app.

That means all you have to do is open Google Maps, search for a restaurant and you can instantly check out its most popular dishes in the restaurant's overview tab. You can then take a deeper look at the menu and tap on popular dishes to explore reviews and photos — again, all from within Maps.

Image Source: Google

As we mentioned yesterday in our post about Google Maps now showing speed limits and speed cameras in 40+ cameras, today's news continues a trend toward increasing and multi-faceted functionality within Google Maps. As Falcon explains, "From a redesigned Explore tab in Google Maps that helps you find things to do, group planning features that make it easier to coordinate with friends and family, and now popular dishes, Google Maps is helping you get out and enjoy the world."

Google Talking To US On Huawei's Behalf, Official Of Chinese Firm Says - NPR

Posted: 06 Jun 2019 09:15 PM PDT

Huawei employees wait for a shuttle bus at the company's campus on April 12 in Shenzhen, China. A senior Huawei official says Google is talking with the U.S. government on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Huawei employees wait for a shuttle bus at the company's campus on April 12 in Shenzhen, China. A senior Huawei official says Google is talking with the U.S. government on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant.

Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

Google is quietly assuming the role of Huawei emissary, according to a senior Huawei official, in effect negotiating with the Commerce Department on behalf of the Chinese telecom giant that has been blacklisted in the U.S.

The fates of Huawei and Google are intertwined. Huawei is a leader in creating next-generation wireless networks, and it's the world's No. 2 maker of smartphones. Google provides support for Android, the popular mobile operating system. The U.S. government ban against Huawei also blocks Google from giving security updates to millions of existing Huawei phones and from issuing Android licenses in the future. (Google is an NPR sponsor.)

In an interview this week with Huawei Chairman Liang Hua, NPR asked him how his company would resolve the problem of losing access to Google software.

"Google is a very responsible company. We have maintained very good cooperation with each other," Liang said through a translator at Huawei headquarters in Shenzhen, China. "We really look forward to productive results from the communication that Google is currently having with the Commerce Department."

When the Huawei ban first went into effect, and Google announced it would cut ties, there was an outcry. Days later, the Trump administration said it would postpone parts of the ban until August.

The outsize power of American tech giants is well-understood the world over. Huawei's Liang is now leaning on Google to influence the Commerce Department on his company's behalf.

"We really hope that there are possible remedies coming out of the communication between Google and the Commerce Department," he said. "We think that it is in the benefit of the consumers if they could work out a solution."

Last month, citing national security concerns, the Trump administration added Huawei to a list of banned entities. American companies — from mobile providers to chipmakers like Intel and Qualcomm — will not be allowed to do business with Huawei. That's because, according to U.S. officials, the company's technology could be used for surveillance. If a resolution isn't reached, Liang says, Huawei will have to build its own software, which would be "difficult."

Liang says he does not know the details of the talks.

In an email, a Google spokesperson said: "Like other U.S. companies, we're engaging with the Department of Commerce to ensure we're in full compliance with its requirements and temporary license. Our focus is protecting the security of Google users on the millions of existing Huawei handsets in the U.S. and around the world today and going forward."

The company declined to say whether its talks with the government have included directly or indirectly advocating for the ability to support future Huawei devices.

NPR interviewed several former senior officials at Commerce and the White House who are concerned that a private company, governed by its own self-interests, is advocating for a foreign partner that has been officially blacklisted for security concerns.

Eric Hirschhorn says turning Huawei into a bargaining chip in the U.S.-China trade war was a strategic mistake. "I spent a lot of time [trying] to make sure that national security and trade were kept separate," he said. Mixing the two "would have been unheard of."

Hirschhorn served in the Commerce Department during the Obama administration as an undersecretary for industry and security.

According to former Commerce officials, it's standard for companies to reach out to the department about their ability to do business abroad. But the foreign partner is often at the table, too, able to talk and be questioned.

Hirschhorn says the process changes once the U.S. government decides to take enforcement action – as it did last month when the U.S. banned Huawei. He says company financials should not be considered alongside national security decisions. And, he says, if Huawei gets what it wants, through Google's efforts, that sends a "very, very bad message" to people who break U.S. rules.

"If I know that my government or my powerful business partner can basically fix a ticket if I get one, I won't worry about speeding," Hirschhorn says.

The Commerce Department says it routinely responds to inquiries from companies about regulatory requirements. It says this is not new to this administration, and these discussions don't influence law enforcement actions.

NPR's Pallavi Gogoi contributed to this report.

20 Perfect Audiobooks To Listen To While Road-Tripping This Summer - BuzzFeed News

Posted: 06 Jun 2019 03:22 PM PDT

Three years after her husband, Devon, died in a car crash, Ashley Ryan still hasn't moved on. To help take her mind off things, her friends surprise her with a getaway to Catalina Cove, Louisiana, where — instead of a relaxing vacation — she finds her dead husband, very much alive. Tessa learns that Devon is suffering from amnesia and, though he doesn't remember their life together, the feelings they had for each other are still there. After the doctors recommend that Tessa keep the truth to herself, she and Devon fall in love again as strangers, giving her the second chance she never thought she'd get.

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