Friday, May 24, 2019

“How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search - Search Engine Journal” plus 2 more

“How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search - Search Engine Journal” plus 2 more


How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search - Search Engine Journal

Posted: 19 May 2019 05:05 AM PDT

Featured snippets are driven by a specific ranking algorithm that is separate from the core algorithm. That's my theory. For me, the idea holds (a lot) of water.

And I'm not alone. Experts such as Eric Enge, Cindy Krum, and Hannah Thorpe have the same idea.

To try to get confirmation or a rebuttal of that theory, I asked Gary Illyes this question at the SMS Sydney conference:

Does the Featured Snippet function on a different algorithm than the 10 blue links?

The answer absolutely floored me.

He gave me (and 20 others in the room) an overview of what a new search engineer learns when they start working at Google.

Please remember that the system described in this article is confirmed to be true, but that some conclusions I draw are not (in italics), and that all the numbers here are completely invented by me.

The aim of this article is to give an overview of how ranking functions. Not what the individual ranking factors are, nor their relative weighting / importance, nor the inner workings of the multi-candidate bidding system. Those remain a super-secret (I 100% see why that is the case).

How Ranking Works in Google Search

What Are the Ranking Factors?

There are hundreds/thousands of ranking factors. Google doesn't tell us what they are in detail (which, by the by, seems to me to be reasonable).

They do tell us that they group them: Topicality, Quality, PageSpeed, RankBrain, Entities, Structured Data, Freshness… and others.

A couple of things to point here:

  • Those seven are real ranking factors we can count on (in no particular order).
  • Each ranking factor includes multiple signals, for example Quality is mostly PageRank but also includes other signals and Structured Data includes not only Schema.org but also tables, lists, semantic HTML5 and certainly a few others.

Google calculates a score for a page for each of the ranking factors.

Example of Google Ranking FactorsSomething like this

Remember that throughout this article, all these numbers are completely hypothetical.

How Ranking Factors Contribute to the Bid

Google takes the individual ranking factor scores and combines them to calculate the total score (the term 'bid' is used, which makes super good sense to me).

Importantly, the total bid is calculated by multiplying these scores.

Ranking Score Example GoogleSomething like this

The total score has an upper limit of 2 to the power of 64… not 100% sure, but I think that is what Illyes said, so perhaps it is a reference to the Wheat and Chessboard problem where the numbers on the second half of the chessboard are so phenomenally off-the-scale that it is effectively a kind of fail-safe buffer).

That means these individual scores could be single, double, triple, or even quadruple digits and the total would never hit that upper limit.

That very high ceiling also means that Google can continue to throw in more factors and never have a need to "dampen" the existing scores to make space for the new one.

Just up to there, my mind was already swirling. But it gets better.

Watch out – One Single Low Score Can Kill a Bid

And the fact that the total is calculated by multiplication is a phenomenal insight. Why? Because any single score under 1 will seriously handicap that bid, whatever the other scores are.

Low Scoring Result Example Google

Look at how the score tanks as just one factor drops slightly below 1. That is enough to put this page out of contention.

Dropping further below 1 will generally kill it off. It is possible to overcome a sub-1 ranking factor. But the other factors would need to be phenomenally strong.

Looking at the numbers below, one gets an idea of just how strong. Ignoring a weak factor is not a good strategy. Working to get that factor above 1 is a great strategy.

My bet here is that the super impressive 'up and to the right SEO wins' examples we (often) see in the SEO industry are examples of when a site *simply* corrects a sub-1 ranking factor.

Very Low Scoring Results Example

This system rewards pages that have good scores across the board. Pages that perform well on some factors, but badly on others will always struggle. A balanced approach wins.

Credit to Brent D Payne for making this great analogy: "Better to be a straight C student than 3 As and an F".

What a Bid-Based Ranking Looks like

Google Bid-Based Ranking ExampleTis is just an example

Refining the Bids for a Final Ranking

The top results (let's say 10) are sent to a second algorithm that is designed to refine the ranking and remove any unacceptable results that slipped through the net.

The factors taken into account here are different and appear to be aimed at specific cases.

This recalculation can raise or lower a bid (or conceivably leave it the same).

My understanding is that it is most likely to push a bid down.  I'll take that further and suggest that this is a filter currently aimed principally at blocking irrelevant, low quality and black hat content that the initial algorithm missed.

So we are looking at a final set of bids that might look something like this.

Google Refined Ranking Example

Note that in this example, one result gets one zero score and is therefore completely removed from consideration / eliminated (remember, because we are multiplying, any individual zero score will guarantee that the overall score is also zero). And that is seriously radical. And a very significant fact, however you look at it.

Such a zero can be generated algorithmically.

My guess is that a zero could additionally serve as a way to implement some manual actions (this is a pretty big jump from what I was told, and is my conclusion and has in no way be confirmed by anyone at Google).

What is sure is that the order changes and we have a final list of results for the web / "10 blue links."

If that weren't enough for one day, now it gets really interesting.

Rich Elements Are 'Candidate Result Sets' (My Term, Not Google's)

Candidate Result Sets Compete for a Place on Page 1

Each type of result/rich element is effectively competing for a place on page 1.

News, images, videos, featured snippets, carousels, maps, GMB, etc. – each one provides a list of candidates for Page 1 with their bids.

There is already quite a variety competing to appear on Page 1, and that list keeps on growing.

Rich SERP Result TypesWith this system, there is no theoretical limit to the number of rich elements that Google can create to bid for a place.

Candidate Result Ranking Factors

The terms 'Candidate Result' and 'Candidate Result Set' are from me, not from Google

The combination of factors that affect ranking in these candidate result sets is necessarily specific to each since some factors will be unique to an individual candidate result set and some will not apply.

An example would be alt tags that apply to the Images candidate result set, but not to others, or a news sitemap that would be necessary for the News candidate result set, but have no place in a calculation for the others.

Candidate Result Set Ranking Factor Weightings

The relative weighing of each factor will also necessarily be different for each candidate result set since each one provides a specific type of information in a specific format.

And the aim is to provide the most appropriate elements to the user in terms:

  • The content itself.
  • The media format.
  • The place on the page.

For example, freshness is going to be a heavily weighted factor in News,  and perhaps RankBrain for Featured Snippets.

Candidate Result Set Bid Calculations

The bids provided by each candidate result set are calculated in the same way as the first Web/blue links example (by multiplication and, I assume, with the second refinement algorithm).

Google then has multiple candidates bidding for a place (or several places, depending on the type).

How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search

Pulling It All Together for Page 1

Candidate Result Sets Bid Against Each Other

My initial question was about the Featured Snippet, and I am certain that the top bid from that specific candidate result set had to outbid the top result for the Web to "win."

For the others, that doesn't make 100% sense. So I am assuming the rules to "win" are different for each candidate result set. 

Rich Elements Winning Bids ExampleThe rules I used to make these winning choices are fictional, and not how Google really does this.

Google is looking for any rich result that will provide a "better" solution for the user.

When it does identify a "better" candidate result, that result is given a place (at the expense of one or more classic blue links).

The Final Choice of Rich Elements on Page 1

Each candidate result set is subject to specific limitations – and all are subservient to that traditional web result/classic blue links (for the moment, at least).

  • One result, one possible position (featured snippet, news, for example)
  • Multiple results, multiple possible positions (images, videos, for example)
  • Multiple results, one possible position (news, carousel, for example)

And the winners in my example are (remember that the rules I used to make these choices are fictional, and not how Google really does this)…

  • News: Failed to outbid the #1 Web bid and is therefore not sufficiently relevant and does not win a place.
  • Images: We have one winner. The space allotted is 5 so the other 4 get a free ride.
  • Video: Two are outbidding the top web result so they both get a place.
  • Featured Snippet: We have several winners. But only one is used. Because this is "the" answer.
Final Ranking ExampleWe have our final page and it looks something like this.

As places are given to rich elements, the lower positioned web results drop onto Page 2. Which rather hammers home that we really should not take our eyes off the ongoing demise of blue links.

I reiterate: I have no information about how positions are attributed to the videos or images – I attributed positions to them with my own invented simplistic system, not Google's. 🙂

To End – A Little Theorizing From Me

All of this last chunk is my initial thoughts as I digest all this. Not attributable to Gary or Google.

Darwinism in Search Results

It seems to me that some rich elements will "naturally" grow and win a place on Page 1 increasingly often (featured snippet being an example that we are seeing in action today).

Others will "naturally" shrink (classic blue links on mobile). And some could "naturally" die out entirely. All very Darwinian!

This System Isn't Going Away Any Time Soon

Google's "rich element ranking" system has an in-built capacity to expand and adapt to changes in result/answer delivery. Organically!

New devices, new content formats, personalization… Google can simply create a new rich element, add it to the system and let it bid for a place. It will win a place in results when it is a more appropriate option than the classic blue links. Potentially, over time it will naturally dominate in the micro-moment it is most suited to.

Darwinism in Search. Wow!

Don't know about you, but all in all, my mind is blown.

More Resources:


Image Credits

Featured Image & In-Post Images: Created by Véronique Barnard, May 2019

7 Steps to Create a Money-Making Webpage - Entrepreneur

Posted: 24 May 2019 07:06 AM PDT

Here is a formula to create a webpage that makes money. This seven-step method works most times if it's well executed

6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You're reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

Here is a formula to create a webpage that makes money. This seven-step method works most times if it's well executed.

The technique is general and principles-based. Many business managers follow a similar approach, which I've learned from observing competitors over the years. You could consider it a standard way of produce landing pages and websites with commercial value.

1. Find a commercial product, service or topic

Step One is to find a subject for your page that has commercial value. This may be straightforward if you have a particular product or service to sell. For bloggers, you can do market research or be creative in arriving at a topic, though it's generally best to go for a subject you know about and which is relevant to your site.

An example of a commercial topic is "best electric bikes". When I search the term in Google, sixteen ads appear: four at the top of the results, three at the bottom and nine image ads on the side. Distributors of electric bikes are clearly competing to reach prospective buyers.

An example of a non-commercial topic might be "safe vegetables for hamsters". If you Google that term, you may well see no ads on the page. That shows a lack of competition for search traffic -- even though hamster owners may want to know about the subject.  

2. Identify what prospective customers want

The page's headline, content and call(s) to action should meet the wants of a group of prospective customers. One way to get a feel for customer preferences is to see what other search terms are associated with a page topic.

To illustrate, "best electric bikes" is associated with searches such as "best electric bikes under £1000" and "best budget electric bike". These phrases appear at the bottom of the search page for me. So, one option is to make a page for people looking for cheap electric bikes.

For the purposes of this article, we'll use the highest ranked page from a general website for the search term "best electric bike". That's the digitaltrends.com page, "The best electric bikes for 2019". It has a Google search ranking of five for me at the time of writing.

3. Choose how to monetize the page

Thinking about how to monetize the page is useful early on. For example, you could create an information page that offers valuable advertising space. Alternatively, you may want to promote certain products or services offered by your business or a commercial partner.

A word of caution: don't fall into the trap of focusing on monetization at the expense of user experience. Creating a useful page is the first priority. For bloggers, the popular, high-traffic page comes first and then prospective advertisers and partners start reaching out to you.

Beyond selling your own stuff, the ways to monetize a website or blog are many. Google Adsense is a popular default option. You can run these click ads while using other methods, such as referral partnerships or Amazon-style affiliate programs.

4. Be helpful to your target customers

The next step is to create a page giving your target customers want they want. On its bike-related page, Digital Trends presents picks for the best electric bike in each of six categories, including best mountain bike, road bike and budget option.

Being helpful to readers is vital. By giving useful information, you improve search rankings for the page in multiple ways, including by (i) reducing bounce rates and increasing dwell time (ii) broadening the number of keywords the page ranks for and (iii) increasing the likelihood that other websites link to the page.

People aren't stupid and quickly work out whether a page is useful to them. If the page isn't what they are looking for, expect them to move away quickly -- without clicking on your call(s) to action.

5. Give your page a clean design and feel

A clean design and feel to your webpage make for a good user experience and high conversion rates. Keep it simple and clutter-free with an intuitive flow. Make the writing easy to read.

With a clean design, calls to actions, such as enquiry buttons, are easier to find and they get clicked on more. Further benefits of clean design are higher user trust, faster load times and less page maintenance.

6. Offer the right amount of choice

Offering prospective customers the right amount of choice can make a huge difference to conversion rates. People want to have a sense of control when they are contemplating a purchase or signing up for something.

Giving a single option when choices are possible is generally a no-no. Even if you have only one basic product, you can produce multiple options. For example, you could vary color or style, include optional extras or offer price deals.

Presenting too much choice can also be a mistake. People may be happy to browse through a long list of products if the difference between each item is clear. For similar or complex items, however, you should narrow down lists so the consumer feels confident they can find the ideal choice.

7. Market the page

The final step is to market your page so that you bring in visitors and start getting conversions. You should be well positioned to do this after creating a purpose-built landing page for your target audience.

The ultimate way to get traffic consistently is through Search Engine Optimization (SEO); in other words, by getting your page high up the internet search rankings. SEO is powerful because it continues working after you've stopped spending time and/or money on it.

Landing page SEO covers actions like choosing a catchy title, adding extra search terms to page content, and including images and video. You can also link to the page from other parts of the website and seek links from other websites.

Advertising and other forms of paid marketing can produce results quicker than SEO. To be worthwhile, the return on investment (ROI) should be significantly greater than one. An ROI above one means the extra revenue exceeds advertising costs.

Building a successful online business

Time, skill and practice may be required to get the formula to work for you. To produce strong results, most or all steps need to be done extremely well. Also, a new website will normally struggle to gain significant search traffic.

The more often you create landing pages and go through the process, the better you become. To keep improving, seek statistical and other forms of feedback. The good news is that, as your website grows and ages, it becomes more authoritative and more easily attracts traffic.

To get revenue flowing initially, you may benefit by targeting a niche market with modest commercial potential but also little competition. For example, instead of a page about "best electric bikes", the subject could be "best electric bikes with a child seat".

By generating revenue using the formula, you demonstrate a repeatable, money-making skill. Depending on talent and effort, it could be the foundation for a successful business.

Optimise your search better in Google by using these tips - Odisha Television Ltd.

Posted: 18 May 2019 03:07 AM PDT

There is a little doubt that Google has become one of the most indispensable technological assets accessible to billions of people across the world today. Be it professionals, students, scientists or even a simple layman, Google has earned the reputation of being the most efficient internet tool for carrying out innumerable tasks through online.

What makes it special is its brilliant user-friendly search engine that allows people to find almost everything that is available in the cyberspace.

But as most users fail to take full advantage of Google and its vast tools of exploration, we share some best tricks to make the most out of this incredible asset.

Search by keywords

You should note that searching is all about how easy you can make for the Google to search. That is where keywords come to play. Brainstorm what you really want and select only the best and small number of words for better earch results.

Use search operators like – OR, AND, (*) Asterisk, (-) Minus, Around

  • In case of usage of OR, Google will show results with either-or words or having any of those words in your mention.
  • Usage of AND will prompt Google to list must-have words in the search query.
  • If you use (*) Asterisk, Google will tell intelligently list out all those words or group of words that most likely to present in place of asterisk.
  • Minus will help searchers prohibit words in the search query, because Google lists results that don't have those words in case of usage of Minus.

 Use ("..") double quotes

Double quotes can be used for specific search because Google shows you the results between the quotes with same order of words as listed in the phrase and not any related searches.

Use….site:

Use site: for searching information on related queries within a given website and not from whole of the internet.

Use….related:

By using word 'related' and placing colon (:) after it will help find sites that are similar to the present searched site.

Use… filetype:

By using this trick use can search for specific files on the web rather than content or websites. It is more helpful in case of searches for PDFs, presentations or files with other extensions.

Use… intitle:

It allows you to search the titles of the pages and not just content.

Use…inurl:

This trick aids users search for terms in the URLs of web pages along with keywords.

Use… define:

This facility in Google helps people to ask definitions, synonyms, antonyms of the searched word.

Search for what others are searching

Google Trends is a superb tool not only to keep yourself abreast of what is happening but also what is trending in the cyberspace.

Translate from one language to another

Google also offers swifter and better facility to easily translate text by using Translate option.

Use… Cache:

In case you cannot access to some websites due to blockage, you can fetch cache copies of web pages from the Google rather than original server of the site which has been blocked for you.

Search contacts

This is a magnificent feature applicable only on mobile devices. Through this facility, user can log into his contacts, information and even call them right away through Google Search. Your phone which has synced itself with Google will help you in this. You can also search your photos from your galleries.

Keep it simple and add search items in case Google doesn't shovel out the results as expected

Voice & image search

Use the microphone button in the Google Chrome browser or application on Android to filter search queries based on what you say to it. The more clearly you can pronounce the words the better Google can search for you. In case you want to search for some images but you have an image related to it, so you can basically click the Camera button in the Google Images search bar, paste the image URL or upload picture from your system to make an image search.

“How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search - Search Engine Journal” plus 2 more


How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search - Search Engine Journal

Posted: 19 May 2019 05:05 AM PDT

Featured snippets are driven by a specific ranking algorithm that is separate from the core algorithm. That's my theory. For me, the idea holds (a lot) of water.

And I'm not alone. Experts such as Eric Enge, Cindy Krum, and Hannah Thorpe have the same idea.

To try to get confirmation or a rebuttal of that theory, I asked Gary Illyes this question at the SMS Sydney conference:

Does the Featured Snippet function on a different algorithm than the 10 blue links?

The answer absolutely floored me.

He gave me (and 20 others in the room) an overview of what a new search engineer learns when they start working at Google.

Please remember that the system described in this article is confirmed to be true, but that some conclusions I draw are not (in italics), and that all the numbers here are completely invented by me.

The aim of this article is to give an overview of how ranking functions. Not what the individual ranking factors are, nor their relative weighting / importance, nor the inner workings of the multi-candidate bidding system. Those remain a super-secret (I 100% see why that is the case).

How Ranking Works in Google Search

What Are the Ranking Factors?

There are hundreds/thousands of ranking factors. Google doesn't tell us what they are in detail (which, by the by, seems to me to be reasonable).

They do tell us that they group them: Topicality, Quality, PageSpeed, RankBrain, Entities, Structured Data, Freshness… and others.

A couple of things to point here:

  • Those seven are real ranking factors we can count on (in no particular order).
  • Each ranking factor includes multiple signals, for example Quality is mostly PageRank but also includes other signals and Structured Data includes not only Schema.org but also tables, lists, semantic HTML5 and certainly a few others.

Google calculates a score for a page for each of the ranking factors.

Example of Google Ranking FactorsSomething like this

Remember that throughout this article, all these numbers are completely hypothetical.

How Ranking Factors Contribute to the Bid

Google takes the individual ranking factor scores and combines them to calculate the total score (the term 'bid' is used, which makes super good sense to me).

Importantly, the total bid is calculated by multiplying these scores.

Ranking Score Example GoogleSomething like this

The total score has an upper limit of 2 to the power of 64… not 100% sure, but I think that is what Illyes said, so perhaps it is a reference to the Wheat and Chessboard problem where the numbers on the second half of the chessboard are so phenomenally off-the-scale that it is effectively a kind of fail-safe buffer).

That means these individual scores could be single, double, triple, or even quadruple digits and the total would never hit that upper limit.

That very high ceiling also means that Google can continue to throw in more factors and never have a need to "dampen" the existing scores to make space for the new one.

Just up to there, my mind was already swirling. But it gets better.

Watch out – One Single Low Score Can Kill a Bid

And the fact that the total is calculated by multiplication is a phenomenal insight. Why? Because any single score under 1 will seriously handicap that bid, whatever the other scores are.

Low Scoring Result Example Google

Look at how the score tanks as just one factor drops slightly below 1. That is enough to put this page out of contention.

Dropping further below 1 will generally kill it off. It is possible to overcome a sub-1 ranking factor. But the other factors would need to be phenomenally strong.

Looking at the numbers below, one gets an idea of just how strong. Ignoring a weak factor is not a good strategy. Working to get that factor above 1 is a great strategy.

My bet here is that the super impressive 'up and to the right SEO wins' examples we (often) see in the SEO industry are examples of when a site *simply* corrects a sub-1 ranking factor.

Very Low Scoring Results Example

This system rewards pages that have good scores across the board. Pages that perform well on some factors, but badly on others will always struggle. A balanced approach wins.

Credit to Brent D Payne for making this great analogy: "Better to be a straight C student than 3 As and an F".

What a Bid-Based Ranking Looks like

Google Bid-Based Ranking ExampleTis is just an example

Refining the Bids for a Final Ranking

The top results (let's say 10) are sent to a second algorithm that is designed to refine the ranking and remove any unacceptable results that slipped through the net.

The factors taken into account here are different and appear to be aimed at specific cases.

This recalculation can raise or lower a bid (or conceivably leave it the same).

My understanding is that it is most likely to push a bid down.  I'll take that further and suggest that this is a filter currently aimed principally at blocking irrelevant, low quality and black hat content that the initial algorithm missed.

So we are looking at a final set of bids that might look something like this.

Google Refined Ranking Example

Note that in this example, one result gets one zero score and is therefore completely removed from consideration / eliminated (remember, because we are multiplying, any individual zero score will guarantee that the overall score is also zero). And that is seriously radical. And a very significant fact, however you look at it.

Such a zero can be generated algorithmically.

My guess is that a zero could additionally serve as a way to implement some manual actions (this is a pretty big jump from what I was told, and is my conclusion and has in no way be confirmed by anyone at Google).

What is sure is that the order changes and we have a final list of results for the web / "10 blue links."

If that weren't enough for one day, now it gets really interesting.

Rich Elements Are 'Candidate Result Sets' (My Term, Not Google's)

Candidate Result Sets Compete for a Place on Page 1

Each type of result/rich element is effectively competing for a place on page 1.

News, images, videos, featured snippets, carousels, maps, GMB, etc. – each one provides a list of candidates for Page 1 with their bids.

There is already quite a variety competing to appear on Page 1, and that list keeps on growing.

Rich SERP Result TypesWith this system, there is no theoretical limit to the number of rich elements that Google can create to bid for a place.

Candidate Result Ranking Factors

The terms 'Candidate Result' and 'Candidate Result Set' are from me, not from Google

The combination of factors that affect ranking in these candidate result sets is necessarily specific to each since some factors will be unique to an individual candidate result set and some will not apply.

An example would be alt tags that apply to the Images candidate result set, but not to others, or a news sitemap that would be necessary for the News candidate result set, but have no place in a calculation for the others.

Candidate Result Set Ranking Factor Weightings

The relative weighing of each factor will also necessarily be different for each candidate result set since each one provides a specific type of information in a specific format.

And the aim is to provide the most appropriate elements to the user in terms:

  • The content itself.
  • The media format.
  • The place on the page.

For example, freshness is going to be a heavily weighted factor in News,  and perhaps RankBrain for Featured Snippets.

Candidate Result Set Bid Calculations

The bids provided by each candidate result set are calculated in the same way as the first Web/blue links example (by multiplication and, I assume, with the second refinement algorithm).

Google then has multiple candidates bidding for a place (or several places, depending on the type).

How Google Search Ranking Works – Darwinism in Search

Pulling It All Together for Page 1

Candidate Result Sets Bid Against Each Other

My initial question was about the Featured Snippet, and I am certain that the top bid from that specific candidate result set had to outbid the top result for the Web to "win."

For the others, that doesn't make 100% sense. So I am assuming the rules to "win" are different for each candidate result set. 

Rich Elements Winning Bids ExampleThe rules I used to make these winning choices are fictional, and not how Google really does this.

Google is looking for any rich result that will provide a "better" solution for the user.

When it does identify a "better" candidate result, that result is given a place (at the expense of one or more classic blue links).

The Final Choice of Rich Elements on Page 1

Each candidate result set is subject to specific limitations – and all are subservient to that traditional web result/classic blue links (for the moment, at least).

  • One result, one possible position (featured snippet, news, for example)
  • Multiple results, multiple possible positions (images, videos, for example)
  • Multiple results, one possible position (news, carousel, for example)

And the winners in my example are (remember that the rules I used to make these choices are fictional, and not how Google really does this)…

  • News: Failed to outbid the #1 Web bid and is therefore not sufficiently relevant and does not win a place.
  • Images: We have one winner. The space allotted is 5 so the other 4 get a free ride.
  • Video: Two are outbidding the top web result so they both get a place.
  • Featured Snippet: We have several winners. But only one is used. Because this is "the" answer.
Final Ranking ExampleWe have our final page and it looks something like this.

As places are given to rich elements, the lower positioned web results drop onto Page 2. Which rather hammers home that we really should not take our eyes off the ongoing demise of blue links.

I reiterate: I have no information about how positions are attributed to the videos or images – I attributed positions to them with my own invented simplistic system, not Google's. 🙂

To End – A Little Theorizing From Me

All of this last chunk is my initial thoughts as I digest all this. Not attributable to Gary or Google.

Darwinism in Search Results

It seems to me that some rich elements will "naturally" grow and win a place on Page 1 increasingly often (featured snippet being an example that we are seeing in action today).

Others will "naturally" shrink (classic blue links on mobile). And some could "naturally" die out entirely. All very Darwinian!

This System Isn't Going Away Any Time Soon

Google's "rich element ranking" system has an in-built capacity to expand and adapt to changes in result/answer delivery. Organically!

New devices, new content formats, personalization… Google can simply create a new rich element, add it to the system and let it bid for a place. It will win a place in results when it is a more appropriate option than the classic blue links. Potentially, over time it will naturally dominate in the micro-moment it is most suited to.

Darwinism in Search. Wow!

Don't know about you, but all in all, my mind is blown.

More Resources:


Image Credits

Featured Image & In-Post Images: Created by Véronique Barnard, May 2019

7 Steps to Create a Money-Making Webpage - Entrepreneur

Posted: 24 May 2019 07:06 AM PDT

Here is a formula to create a webpage that makes money. This seven-step method works most times if it's well executed

6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You're reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

Here is a formula to create a webpage that makes money. This seven-step method works most times if it's well executed.

The technique is general and principles-based. Many business managers follow a similar approach, which I've learned from observing competitors over the years. You could consider it a standard way of produce landing pages and websites with commercial value.

1. Find a commercial product, service or topic

Step One is to find a subject for your page that has commercial value. This may be straightforward if you have a particular product or service to sell. For bloggers, you can do market research or be creative in arriving at a topic, though it's generally best to go for a subject you know about and which is relevant to your site.

An example of a commercial topic is "best electric bikes". When I search the term in Google, sixteen ads appear: four at the top of the results, three at the bottom and nine image ads on the side. Distributors of electric bikes are clearly competing to reach prospective buyers.

An example of a non-commercial topic might be "safe vegetables for hamsters". If you Google that term, you may well see no ads on the page. That shows a lack of competition for search traffic -- even though hamster owners may want to know about the subject.  

2. Identify what prospective customers want

The page's headline, content and call(s) to action should meet the wants of a group of prospective customers. One way to get a feel for customer preferences is to see what other search terms are associated with a page topic.

To illustrate, "best electric bikes" is associated with searches such as "best electric bikes under £1000" and "best budget electric bike". These phrases appear at the bottom of the search page for me. So, one option is to make a page for people looking for cheap electric bikes.

For the purposes of this article, we'll use the highest ranked page from a general website for the search term "best electric bike". That's the digitaltrends.com page, "The best electric bikes for 2019". It has a Google search ranking of five for me at the time of writing.

3. Choose how to monetize the page

Thinking about how to monetize the page is useful early on. For example, you could create an information page that offers valuable advertising space. Alternatively, you may want to promote certain products or services offered by your business or a commercial partner.

A word of caution: don't fall into the trap of focusing on monetization at the expense of user experience. Creating a useful page is the first priority. For bloggers, the popular, high-traffic page comes first and then prospective advertisers and partners start reaching out to you.

Beyond selling your own stuff, the ways to monetize a website or blog are many. Google Adsense is a popular default option. You can run these click ads while using other methods, such as referral partnerships or Amazon-style affiliate programs.

4. Be helpful to your target customers

The next step is to create a page giving your target customers want they want. On its bike-related page, Digital Trends presents picks for the best electric bike in each of six categories, including best mountain bike, road bike and budget option.

Being helpful to readers is vital. By giving useful information, you improve search rankings for the page in multiple ways, including by (i) reducing bounce rates and increasing dwell time (ii) broadening the number of keywords the page ranks for and (iii) increasing the likelihood that other websites link to the page.

People aren't stupid and quickly work out whether a page is useful to them. If the page isn't what they are looking for, expect them to move away quickly -- without clicking on your call(s) to action.

5. Give your page a clean design and feel

A clean design and feel to your webpage make for a good user experience and high conversion rates. Keep it simple and clutter-free with an intuitive flow. Make the writing easy to read.

With a clean design, calls to actions, such as enquiry buttons, are easier to find and they get clicked on more. Further benefits of clean design are higher user trust, faster load times and less page maintenance.

6. Offer the right amount of choice

Offering prospective customers the right amount of choice can make a huge difference to conversion rates. People want to have a sense of control when they are contemplating a purchase or signing up for something.

Giving a single option when choices are possible is generally a no-no. Even if you have only one basic product, you can produce multiple options. For example, you could vary color or style, include optional extras or offer price deals.

Presenting too much choice can also be a mistake. People may be happy to browse through a long list of products if the difference between each item is clear. For similar or complex items, however, you should narrow down lists so the consumer feels confident they can find the ideal choice.

7. Market the page

The final step is to market your page so that you bring in visitors and start getting conversions. You should be well positioned to do this after creating a purpose-built landing page for your target audience.

The ultimate way to get traffic consistently is through Search Engine Optimization (SEO); in other words, by getting your page high up the internet search rankings. SEO is powerful because it continues working after you've stopped spending time and/or money on it.

Landing page SEO covers actions like choosing a catchy title, adding extra search terms to page content, and including images and video. You can also link to the page from other parts of the website and seek links from other websites.

Advertising and other forms of paid marketing can produce results quicker than SEO. To be worthwhile, the return on investment (ROI) should be significantly greater than one. An ROI above one means the extra revenue exceeds advertising costs.

Building a successful online business

Time, skill and practice may be required to get the formula to work for you. To produce strong results, most or all steps need to be done extremely well. Also, a new website will normally struggle to gain significant search traffic.

The more often you create landing pages and go through the process, the better you become. To keep improving, seek statistical and other forms of feedback. The good news is that, as your website grows and ages, it becomes more authoritative and more easily attracts traffic.

To get revenue flowing initially, you may benefit by targeting a niche market with modest commercial potential but also little competition. For example, instead of a page about "best electric bikes", the subject could be "best electric bikes with a child seat".

By generating revenue using the formula, you demonstrate a repeatable, money-making skill. Depending on talent and effort, it could be the foundation for a successful business.

Optimise your search better in Google by using these tips - Odisha Television Ltd.

Posted: 18 May 2019 03:07 AM PDT

There is a little doubt that Google has become one of the most indispensable technological assets accessible to billions of people across the world today. Be it professionals, students, scientists or even a simple layman, Google has earned the reputation of being the most efficient internet tool for carrying out innumerable tasks through online.

What makes it special is its brilliant user-friendly search engine that allows people to find almost everything that is available in the cyberspace.

But as most users fail to take full advantage of Google and its vast tools of exploration, we share some best tricks to make the most out of this incredible asset.

Search by keywords

You should note that searching is all about how easy you can make for the Google to search. That is where keywords come to play. Brainstorm what you really want and select only the best and small number of words for better earch results.

Use search operators like – OR, AND, (*) Asterisk, (-) Minus, Around

  • In case of usage of OR, Google will show results with either-or words or having any of those words in your mention.
  • Usage of AND will prompt Google to list must-have words in the search query.
  • If you use (*) Asterisk, Google will tell intelligently list out all those words or group of words that most likely to present in place of asterisk.
  • Minus will help searchers prohibit words in the search query, because Google lists results that don't have those words in case of usage of Minus.

 Use ("..") double quotes

Double quotes can be used for specific search because Google shows you the results between the quotes with same order of words as listed in the phrase and not any related searches.

Use….site:

Use site: for searching information on related queries within a given website and not from whole of the internet.

Use….related:

By using word 'related' and placing colon (:) after it will help find sites that are similar to the present searched site.

Use… filetype:

By using this trick use can search for specific files on the web rather than content or websites. It is more helpful in case of searches for PDFs, presentations or files with other extensions.

Use… intitle:

It allows you to search the titles of the pages and not just content.

Use…inurl:

This trick aids users search for terms in the URLs of web pages along with keywords.

Use… define:

This facility in Google helps people to ask definitions, synonyms, antonyms of the searched word.

Search for what others are searching

Google Trends is a superb tool not only to keep yourself abreast of what is happening but also what is trending in the cyberspace.

Translate from one language to another

Google also offers swifter and better facility to easily translate text by using Translate option.

Use… Cache:

In case you cannot access to some websites due to blockage, you can fetch cache copies of web pages from the Google rather than original server of the site which has been blocked for you.

Search contacts

This is a magnificent feature applicable only on mobile devices. Through this facility, user can log into his contacts, information and even call them right away through Google Search. Your phone which has synced itself with Google will help you in this. You can also search your photos from your galleries.

Keep it simple and add search items in case Google doesn't shovel out the results as expected

Voice & image search

Use the microphone button in the Google Chrome browser or application on Android to filter search queries based on what you say to it. The more clearly you can pronounce the words the better Google can search for you. In case you want to search for some images but you have an image related to it, so you can basically click the Camera button in the Google Images search bar, paste the image URL or upload picture from your system to make an image search.

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