Tuesday, March 12, 2019

google search

google search


Rupert Murdoch's News Corp Australia calls for breakup of Google - CNN

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:37 AM PDT

What will Google Hotels mean for online booking sites? - Search Engine Land

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:37 PM PDT

Nearly a decade ago, Google bought travel software company ITA. ITA was the company behind the reservations systems for many major airlines and travel sites such as Kayak, Orbitz, Hotwire and many others. At the time of the acquisition, Google said it wanted to create new kinds of online travel experiences that "solve end user problems" and "look different" from existing tools, according to then Google CEO Eric Schmidt.

A decade of development. It has taken a very long time for those differentiated experiences to start showing up — and they're arguably not all that differentiated (except by being a part of Google). About seven years ago the company launched Google Flights, which has received several UI and feature upgrades over time. Then there was Google Trips in 2016, a travel app integrated with Gmail. Now Google has launched a new Hotel search and booking site.

Google Hotels offers all the functionality and tools of its competitors such as Kayak, Expedia and Booking.com. It has the benefit of Google Maps and integration with Google search results (generally pretty high in results). The question thus arises: will Google Hotels create a giant black hole that sucks all the direct traffic away from online hotel booking sites?

There's some evidence that Google flights is having a significant impact on the market, suggesting that Google Hotels will be successful as well.

Why you should care. According to the U.S. Travel Association, more than $1 billion was spent on leisure travel and $317 billion on business travel in 2017. Digital ad spending by the travel industry is projected to exceed $9 billion this year, according to several industry estimates. It's a massive market.

Google Hotels is part of Google's larger play for an increasing share of that vertical advertising pie. Google also believes it's serving the consumer with a new and improved hotel finder.

Online paid-search competition is intensifying with many hotel brands bidding on rival's names and trademarks. It's getting much more challenging to be visible in organic results for hotel category searches (e.g., hotels Los Angeles). Accordingly, hospitality brands are now all but compelled to buy Hotel Ads to appear anywhere above the fold.



About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes a personal blog, Screenwerk, about connecting the dots between digital media and real-world consumer behavior. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.

Google explains how dates within search results snippets work - Search Engine Land

Posted: 11 Mar 2019 06:40 AM PDT

Google has published an article this morning lifting the veil on when and how it shows dates in search results snippets, and offered a few best practices for helping Google find the right date for that snippet. As you know, over the years Google has been criticized or showing the wrong dates for some search results snippets, so this blog post may help them communicate those issues going forward.

Where is the date in the snippet? For some search results, Google may decide to show the date the content was published or updated. Currently, that date is found before the search result snippet, under the URL. Here is a sample screenshot:

When Google shows a date in the snippet. Google can show a date in the snippet when its algorithm determines the content is either time-sensitive, news-oriented, or something related to content that is fresh and new.

How Google picks a date. Google won't give a definitive, single answer for how they pick a date. Google said they use "a variety of factors, including but not limited to: any prominent date listed on the page itself or dates provided by the publisher through structured markup." Why not use a single factor? Google said "because all of them can be prone to issues. Publishers may not always provide a clear visible date. Sometimes, structured data may be lacking or may not be adjusted to the correct time zone."

How to help Google find the date. SEOs help Google pick the right date by (a) showing a visible date prominently on the page and/or (b) using the datePublished and dateModified schema with the correct time zone designator for AMP or non-AMP pages.

Google News guidelines. Over the years, some publishers were caught intentionally or unintentionally tricking Google News into thinking a story was published more recently than it really was published. Google is reminding publishers to review the guidelines around dates in their news articles.

Best practices. Google then published six best practices you can follow to help Google with these issues.

(1) Show when a page has been updated
(2) Use the right time zone
(3) Be consistent in usage
(4) Don't use future dates or dates related to what a page is about
(5) Follow Google's structured data guidelines
(6) Troubleshoot by minimizing other dates on the page

Why it matters. Imagine if someone finds your article in Google and it shows as a story that was published today when in reality it was published a year ago. It might confuse your reader and lead to issues about your site's credibility. You probably aren't even at fault. But you can help Google make sure it has the right date for your stories if you try to follow these best practices. At the same time, if you intentionally try to fool Google, that would be against Google's guidelines and you can end up penalized.



About The Author

Barry Schwartz is Search Engine Land's News Editor and owns RustyBrick, a NY based web consulting firm. He also runs Search Engine Roundtable, a popular search blog on SEM topics.

Google streamlines its hotel search - Travel Weekly

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:26 AM PDT

Google has updated a pair of landing pages that were previously part of the company's now-defunct HotelFinder hotel search product.

Starting this month, when guests visit the Google.com/hotels or Google.com/travel/hotels sites, they will directly access the search platform's existing hotel search tool. Previously, both URLs showed a redirect notice that instructed them to go to Google Search or Maps to find hotels and access the tool.

Media outlets have characterized the revamped landing pages as a new standalone hotel booking product, speculating that the change signals Google's continued encroachment into OTA territory. Google, however, has downplayed the significance of the move, with the update solely intended to eliminate the need for a redirect notice.

Concurrently, Google unveiled new hotel search filters. They include a "Deals filter" and the ability to filter by hotel chain and specific property features.

Adobe Advertising Cloud Search Adds Support For Google Target CPA, ROAS Bidding 03/13/2019 - MediaPost Communications

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 01:14 PM PDT

Adobe Advertising Cloud has expanded support in its cloud search services for Google Smart Bidding strategies such as targeted cost per acquisition (CPA) and targeted return on ad spend (ROAD).

Announced Tuesday, Target CPA and Target ROAS are now supported in Advertising Cloud Search as part of Adobe's portfolio. The extensions aim to help advertisers simplify reporting and save time through access to multiple bidding technologies.

Advertisers also will gain enhanced bulk management features by allowing changes of performance targets and spend strategy at the portfolio level due to the addition of Google Target CPA or Target ROAS.

These new capabilities for advertisers include enhanced bulk management features, increased performance by leveraging unique data and audience integrations with Adobe Experience Cloud, and global performance management across different bidding technologies in one platform.

Advertising Cloud Search relies on data and audience integrations with Adobe Experience Cloud powered by Adobe Sensei, the company's artificial intelligence and machine-learning framework.

Adobe Sensei AI supports performance optimization, performance forecasting and spend recommendations and makes the trade-off decisions on bid amounts and budget allocation more efficiently meet an advertiser's goals. 

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google search


Rupert Murdoch's News Corp Australia calls for breakup of Google - CNN

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 06:37 AM PDT

What will Google Hotels mean for online booking sites? - Search Engine Land

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 02:37 PM PDT

Nearly a decade ago, Google bought travel software company ITA. ITA was the company behind the reservations systems for many major airlines and travel sites such as Kayak, Orbitz, Hotwire and many others. At the time of the acquisition, Google said it wanted to create new kinds of online travel experiences that "solve end user problems" and "look different" from existing tools, according to then Google CEO Eric Schmidt.

A decade of development. It has taken a very long time for those differentiated experiences to start showing up — and they're arguably not all that differentiated (except by being a part of Google). About seven years ago the company launched Google Flights, which has received several UI and feature upgrades over time. Then there was Google Trips in 2016, a travel app integrated with Gmail. Now Google has launched a new Hotel search and booking site.

Google Hotels offers all the functionality and tools of its competitors such as Kayak, Expedia and Booking.com. It has the benefit of Google Maps and integration with Google search results (generally pretty high in results). The question thus arises: will Google Hotels create a giant black hole that sucks all the direct traffic away from online hotel booking sites?

There's some evidence that Google flights is having a significant impact on the market, suggesting that Google Hotels will be successful as well.

Why you should care. According to the U.S. Travel Association, more than $1 billion was spent on leisure travel and $317 billion on business travel in 2017. Digital ad spending by the travel industry is projected to exceed $9 billion this year, according to several industry estimates. It's a massive market.

Google Hotels is part of Google's larger play for an increasing share of that vertical advertising pie. Google also believes it's serving the consumer with a new and improved hotel finder.

Online paid-search competition is intensifying with many hotel brands bidding on rival's names and trademarks. It's getting much more challenging to be visible in organic results for hotel category searches (e.g., hotels Los Angeles). Accordingly, hospitality brands are now all but compelled to buy Hotel Ads to appear anywhere above the fold.



About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes a personal blog, Screenwerk, about connecting the dots between digital media and real-world consumer behavior. He is also VP of Strategy and Insights for the Local Search Association. Follow him on Twitter or find him at Google+.

Google explains how dates within search results snippets work - Search Engine Land

Posted: 11 Mar 2019 06:40 AM PDT

Google has published an article this morning lifting the veil on when and how it shows dates in search results snippets, and offered a few best practices for helping Google find the right date for that snippet. As you know, over the years Google has been criticized or showing the wrong dates for some search results snippets, so this blog post may help them communicate those issues going forward.

Where is the date in the snippet? For some search results, Google may decide to show the date the content was published or updated. Currently, that date is found before the search result snippet, under the URL. Here is a sample screenshot:

When Google shows a date in the snippet. Google can show a date in the snippet when its algorithm determines the content is either time-sensitive, news-oriented, or something related to content that is fresh and new.

How Google picks a date. Google won't give a definitive, single answer for how they pick a date. Google said they use "a variety of factors, including but not limited to: any prominent date listed on the page itself or dates provided by the publisher through structured markup." Why not use a single factor? Google said "because all of them can be prone to issues. Publishers may not always provide a clear visible date. Sometimes, structured data may be lacking or may not be adjusted to the correct time zone."

How to help Google find the date. SEOs help Google pick the right date by (a) showing a visible date prominently on the page and/or (b) using the datePublished and dateModified schema with the correct time zone designator for AMP or non-AMP pages.

Google News guidelines. Over the years, some publishers were caught intentionally or unintentionally tricking Google News into thinking a story was published more recently than it really was published. Google is reminding publishers to review the guidelines around dates in their news articles.

Best practices. Google then published six best practices you can follow to help Google with these issues.

(1) Show when a page has been updated
(2) Use the right time zone
(3) Be consistent in usage
(4) Don't use future dates or dates related to what a page is about
(5) Follow Google's structured data guidelines
(6) Troubleshoot by minimizing other dates on the page

Why it matters. Imagine if someone finds your article in Google and it shows as a story that was published today when in reality it was published a year ago. It might confuse your reader and lead to issues about your site's credibility. You probably aren't even at fault. But you can help Google make sure it has the right date for your stories if you try to follow these best practices. At the same time, if you intentionally try to fool Google, that would be against Google's guidelines and you can end up penalized.



About The Author

Barry Schwartz is Search Engine Land's News Editor and owns RustyBrick, a NY based web consulting firm. He also runs Search Engine Roundtable, a popular search blog on SEM topics.

Google streamlines its hotel search - Travel Weekly

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 11:26 AM PDT

Google has updated a pair of landing pages that were previously part of the company's now-defunct HotelFinder hotel search product.

Starting this month, when guests visit the Google.com/hotels or Google.com/travel/hotels sites, they will directly access the search platform's existing hotel search tool. Previously, both URLs showed a redirect notice that instructed them to go to Google Search or Maps to find hotels and access the tool.

Media outlets have characterized the revamped landing pages as a new standalone hotel booking product, speculating that the change signals Google's continued encroachment into OTA territory. Google, however, has downplayed the significance of the move, with the update solely intended to eliminate the need for a redirect notice.

Concurrently, Google unveiled new hotel search filters. They include a "Deals filter" and the ability to filter by hotel chain and specific property features.

Adobe Advertising Cloud Search Adds Support For Google Target CPA, ROAS Bidding 03/13/2019 - MediaPost Communications

Posted: 12 Mar 2019 01:14 PM PDT

Adobe Advertising Cloud has expanded support in its cloud search services for Google Smart Bidding strategies such as targeted cost per acquisition (CPA) and targeted return on ad spend (ROAD).

Announced Tuesday, Target CPA and Target ROAS are now supported in Advertising Cloud Search as part of Adobe's portfolio. The extensions aim to help advertisers simplify reporting and save time through access to multiple bidding technologies.

Advertisers also will gain enhanced bulk management features by allowing changes of performance targets and spend strategy at the portfolio level due to the addition of Google Target CPA or Target ROAS.

These new capabilities for advertisers include enhanced bulk management features, increased performance by leveraging unique data and audience integrations with Adobe Experience Cloud, and global performance management across different bidding technologies in one platform.

Advertising Cloud Search relies on data and audience integrations with Adobe Experience Cloud powered by Adobe Sensei, the company's artificial intelligence and machine-learning framework.

Adobe Sensei AI supports performance optimization, performance forecasting and spend recommendations and makes the trade-off decisions on bid amounts and budget allocation more efficiently meet an advertiser's goals. 

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