Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Aramark Tackles Game Day With 35 of the Hottest Items on Menus at NFL Stadiums - Odessa American

Aramark Tackles Game Day With 35 of the Hottest Items on Menus at NFL Stadiums  Odessa American

Game days are back and Aramark (NYSE: ARMK), the award-winning food and beverage partner of 11 NFL teams, is ready to welcome six million fans back to ...



Aramark Tackles Game Day With 35 of the Hottest Items on Menus at NFL Stadiums  Odessa American

Game days are back and Aramark (NYSE: ARMK), the award-winning food and beverage partner of 11 NFL teams, is ready to welcome six million fans back to ...



“Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads - Verna Magazine” plus 1 more

“Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads - Verna Magazine” plus 1 more


Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads - Verna Magazine

Posted: 01 Aug 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Spread the love

Ads on Google is a blessing to online marketers. What makes it more attractive and best is that the advertisement is paid only after the dormant customers have seen the ad. In other words, the investment return from the online marketing campaignsolely depends on how the marketers select the Adwords. There are a few common mistakes in Google Ads that one must avoid like the

  • Choosing incorrect keywords 

 This is the most common mistake one makes while using Google ads for the first time. One must use relevant, specific and targeted words when using for the online campaign. Useless and broad keywords usually bolt the budget and don't welcome any conversions. With the help of Adwords Keyword Planner, this problem can be solved when selecting the right keywords.

  • Selecting the right match type 

Apart from choosing the right and relevant keyword, the keyword match should also be appropriate and should match and rhythm with the online campaign. Three kinds of keyword matches have been offered by Google Ads.

  1. Broad Match – It means the ads are shown if your keywords are in any order type. For instance, if your ad goes like `sparkle jewel', then it will be shown when someone searches `sparkle fashion jewel', `sparkle junk jewel' or something similar. When using broad match, don't add any punctuation marks like the double or single in the keyword either before or after it.
  2. Phrase Match –It means when someone searches for the keywords or the phrase in the order you entered in the Adword, and then your ad will be shown. For example, `sparkle jewel' will be shown when someone searches `sparkle jewel online shopping'. If one uses the Phrase Match, one should make sure to use double quotes for the keywords like "sparkle jewel" for the match.
  3. Exact Match –Just like the name goes, the ads will be shown when someone searches the exact keyword. But when someone searches `sparkle Jewel in India' or `sparkle jewel in the world', your ad will not be shown. Only when someone searches the exact `sparkle jewel', your ad will be seen.
  4. Avoiding negative keywords 

When using negative keywords, it is a way to leave keywords that are not related or relevant to the campaign and also to the product that is marketed. For example, when you own a women's garment store for formal, ethnic and casual clothes and not the winter clothes, then you can avoid your ad being seen when someone searches for Women's winter clothes. So, by this, you can add the word `winter' as a negative keyword.

  • Tracking performance 

This is usually seen at the beginning of the campaign. The tracking performance is overlooked or not taken seriously during the conversion rate or the campaign's success. They concentrate only to generate traffic on their site and hence avoid or ignore it. It then leads to difficulty in measuring the Return of Investment. 

  • Wrong grouping of keywords

This is the most common mistake when one uses Google Adwords. The group of keywords is used for the same set as for their campaigns and this will lead to their ads being shown whenever someone searches for any of the related keywords. One should use a different campaign and a different keyword and by this, there is more possibility of their ads attracting more relevant business.

  • Expiry dates for the campaigns

Just like the edibles, the ad campaigns come with an expiry date. After a certain period of time, the ads become more common and familiar with the user and it tends to lose its value. So setting up an expiry date, one can avoid such a situation and also they should keep updating the campaigns and be up to date and trendy.

  • Setting the goal

The basic point one needs to understand is that, what do they want from the ad campaigns? One must be clear in mind about the success and accomplishment to estimate the conversion rate before working out with the Google Adword account. With no clear goals, one will fail to achieve the direction and at the end, they will lose the game. There are many users with no clear goals, spend huge money and quit very easily soon.

If you are interested in learning more digital marketing strategies, visit Traffic Radius. We are one of the leading digital marketing experts in Australia.

Booking.com relaxes keyword bidding clause with hotels - PhocusWire

Posted: 22 Jul 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Booking.com has altered its contract with hotel partners so that owners and chains now have the ability to bid freely on brand terms in Google.

Previously, hotels were restricted via their General Delivery Terms with the online travel agency on bidding on certain keywords, such as "booking.com" and other trademarked terms on Google AdWords and generic search terms.

In a letter sent to hoteliers last week, Booking.com says: "We removed the bidding restrictions from our agreement with you. This means you're free to bid on Booking.com via online search engines if you want, which aligns with a recent EU (European Union) ruling.

"The removal applies to all accommodations. There aren't any other changes to your conditions and our mutual agreement, besides additional explanations and clarifications of the GDT terms."

So, for example, alongside allowing hotels to bid freely on their partner's brand name, they can now also vie for attention using "hotels in London" and other destination-specific terms.

Whilst some may see the removal of the clause from contracts as a reason for celebration, in reality the change is unlikely to ignite a major change in the direct marketing tactics of property owners.

Firstly, property owners are still unable to use "booking.com" in the headline or ad description (a key part of Booking.com's strategy is to use the hotel name in its own ads).

Plus, Booking.com will continue regardless to invest in its own marketing efforts to promote its hotel partners by bringing customers to properties via the online travel agency.

“Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads - Verna Magazine” plus 1 more


Costly Mistake You Must Avoid in Google Ads - Verna Magazine

Posted: 01 Aug 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Spread the love

Ads on Google is a blessing to online marketers. What makes it more attractive and best is that the advertisement is paid only after the dormant customers have seen the ad. In other words, the investment return from the online marketing campaignsolely depends on how the marketers select the Adwords. There are a few common mistakes in Google Ads that one must avoid like the

  • Choosing incorrect keywords 

 This is the most common mistake one makes while using Google ads for the first time. One must use relevant, specific and targeted words when using for the online campaign. Useless and broad keywords usually bolt the budget and don't welcome any conversions. With the help of Adwords Keyword Planner, this problem can be solved when selecting the right keywords.

  • Selecting the right match type 

Apart from choosing the right and relevant keyword, the keyword match should also be appropriate and should match and rhythm with the online campaign. Three kinds of keyword matches have been offered by Google Ads.

  1. Broad Match – It means the ads are shown if your keywords are in any order type. For instance, if your ad goes like `sparkle jewel', then it will be shown when someone searches `sparkle fashion jewel', `sparkle junk jewel' or something similar. When using broad match, don't add any punctuation marks like the double or single in the keyword either before or after it.
  2. Phrase Match –It means when someone searches for the keywords or the phrase in the order you entered in the Adword, and then your ad will be shown. For example, `sparkle jewel' will be shown when someone searches `sparkle jewel online shopping'. If one uses the Phrase Match, one should make sure to use double quotes for the keywords like "sparkle jewel" for the match.
  3. Exact Match –Just like the name goes, the ads will be shown when someone searches the exact keyword. But when someone searches `sparkle Jewel in India' or `sparkle jewel in the world', your ad will not be shown. Only when someone searches the exact `sparkle jewel', your ad will be seen.
  4. Avoiding negative keywords 

When using negative keywords, it is a way to leave keywords that are not related or relevant to the campaign and also to the product that is marketed. For example, when you own a women's garment store for formal, ethnic and casual clothes and not the winter clothes, then you can avoid your ad being seen when someone searches for Women's winter clothes. So, by this, you can add the word `winter' as a negative keyword.

  • Tracking performance 

This is usually seen at the beginning of the campaign. The tracking performance is overlooked or not taken seriously during the conversion rate or the campaign's success. They concentrate only to generate traffic on their site and hence avoid or ignore it. It then leads to difficulty in measuring the Return of Investment. 

  • Wrong grouping of keywords

This is the most common mistake when one uses Google Adwords. The group of keywords is used for the same set as for their campaigns and this will lead to their ads being shown whenever someone searches for any of the related keywords. One should use a different campaign and a different keyword and by this, there is more possibility of their ads attracting more relevant business.

  • Expiry dates for the campaigns

Just like the edibles, the ad campaigns come with an expiry date. After a certain period of time, the ads become more common and familiar with the user and it tends to lose its value. So setting up an expiry date, one can avoid such a situation and also they should keep updating the campaigns and be up to date and trendy.

  • Setting the goal

The basic point one needs to understand is that, what do they want from the ad campaigns? One must be clear in mind about the success and accomplishment to estimate the conversion rate before working out with the Google Adword account. With no clear goals, one will fail to achieve the direction and at the end, they will lose the game. There are many users with no clear goals, spend huge money and quit very easily soon.

If you are interested in learning more digital marketing strategies, visit Traffic Radius. We are one of the leading digital marketing experts in Australia.

Booking.com relaxes keyword bidding clause with hotels - PhocusWire

Posted: 22 Jul 2019 12:00 AM PDT

Booking.com has altered its contract with hotel partners so that owners and chains now have the ability to bid freely on brand terms in Google.

Previously, hotels were restricted via their General Delivery Terms with the online travel agency on bidding on certain keywords, such as "booking.com" and other trademarked terms on Google AdWords and generic search terms.

In a letter sent to hoteliers last week, Booking.com says: "We removed the bidding restrictions from our agreement with you. This means you're free to bid on Booking.com via online search engines if you want, which aligns with a recent EU (European Union) ruling.

"The removal applies to all accommodations. There aren't any other changes to your conditions and our mutual agreement, besides additional explanations and clarifications of the GDT terms."

So, for example, alongside allowing hotels to bid freely on their partner's brand name, they can now also vie for attention using "hotels in London" and other destination-specific terms.

Whilst some may see the removal of the clause from contracts as a reason for celebration, in reality the change is unlikely to ignite a major change in the direct marketing tactics of property owners.

Firstly, property owners are still unable to use "booking.com" in the headline or ad description (a key part of Booking.com's strategy is to use the hotel name in its own ads).

Plus, Booking.com will continue regardless to invest in its own marketing efforts to promote its hotel partners by bringing customers to properties via the online travel agency.

Fact-Checking Trump’s Claim That Google ‘Manipulated’ Millions of Votes for Clinton - The New York Times

Fact-Checking Trump’s Claim That Google ‘Manipulated’ Millions of Votes for Clinton - The New York Times


Fact-Checking Trump’s Claim That Google ‘Manipulated’ Millions of Votes for Clinton - The New York Times

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 03:04 PM PDT

What President Trump Said

Mr. Trump lost the popular vote by almost 2.9 million in the 2016 election and has long attributed this loss to baseless claims of voter fraud. Now Mr. Trump suggests that he would have lost the popular vote by a much smaller margin, or even won it, were it not for Google's machinations.

He appears to be referring to a disputed estimate given by Robert Epstein, a psychologist and former editor in chief at Psychology Today who says he supported and voted for Hillary Clinton.

In a 2017 white paper, Mr. Epstein examined how Google Search might have influenced undecided voters in the 2016 election by providing more positive results for one candidate than the other. He estimated that the search results may have swayed "at least 2.6 million votes to Clinton." When he testified to Congress this summer, Mr. Epstein added that the estimate was a "rock bottom minimum" and that up to 10.4 million votes could have been shifted to Mrs. Clinton.

In an interview, Mr. Epstein took issue with Mr. Trump's characterization of his work.

"I've never said Google manipulated the 2016 elections," he said. "The range of numbers he listed in the tweet is also incorrect."

Panagiotis Metaxas, a computer science professor at Wellesley College, emphasized that the white paper showed a possibility — "what such an influence could have been if Google was manipulating its electoral search results" — not a conclusive fact.

"I and other researchers who have been auditing search results for years know that this did not happen," Mr. Metaxas said. "I think that, in his congressional hearing, Dr. Epstein is misrepresenting the situation."

He noted that Google does "sanitize" its search results, prioritizing more trusted sources while devaluing low-quality information sources. (Here's a more detailed explanation of how Google Search works.)

The white paper also came with huge caveats. First, it was not peer-reviewed or rigorously evaluated by other researchers.

It was based on the daily online searches of just 95 participants, 21 of whom were self-described undecided voters — a small sample size to extrapolate to millions of voters, experts said. (Mr. Epstein says that the statistical significance of his findings was high.)

Their election-related search results were then given to another group of people who evaluated whether the results were biased toward Mr. Trump or Mrs. Clinton, and concluded that most favored Mrs. Clinton. Searches conducted on other websites like Yahoo and Bing did not display the same bias, according to the paper.

Then, Mr. Epstein applied his previous research demonstrating that biased search results could shift voting preferences by 20 percent or more to reach his baseline estimate of 2.6 million people affected.

But it takes "a leap of faith" to connect Mr. Epstein's experimental results to actual election outcomes, said Nicholas Diakopoulos, an assistant professor in communication studies at Northwestern University. (Mr. Diakopoulos's own research does show that Google Search results favor Democrats.)

"There's a substantial shift in context, and a difference in asking someone in an experiment about likely voting behavior and how they might actually act during an election," Mr. Diakopoulos said.

A more meticulous scientific analysis measuring the impact of Google Search on election outcomes could, for example, take into account voter history or other sources of election information.

Given the difficulties in disaggregating the impact of Google and the paper's lack of methodological detail, Mr. Diakopoulos said, "I am skeptical of the validity of the estimates."

Curious about the accuracy of a claim? Email factcheck@nytimes.com.

Google Ads to remove accelerated ad delivery option next month - Search Engine Land

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 11:02 AM PDT

Google Ads announced a coming change to ad delivery options that will start September 17. The accelerated delivery option will be removed and standard delivery will be the only option for Search and Shopping campaigns, as well as for campaigns with shared budgets.

Automatic switch by October 1. Any Search or Shopping campaigns and shared budgets using accelerated delivery will be switched over to standard delivery automatically by October 1.

The accelerated delivery option will still be available for Display and Video campaigns, Google said.

Why the change? Advertisers typically opt for accelerated delivery when the goal is to drive as many conversions as possible within a target cost per conversion. This is particularly common for e-commerce advertisers that are willing to spend as much as possible as long as their margins make sense. They choose the accelerated delivery option and set their daily budgets high enough to ensure their ads are served as often as possible throughout the entire day. It's been a particularly popular option for Shopping campaigns.

However, Google says, the way that accelerated delivery works can make it an inefficient option. Obviously, if you do have a capped daily budget, choosing the accelerated option can mean your ads stop serving well before the day ends. But Google also notes, "this method can increase CPCs due to increased competition early in the day, or unintentionally spend most of your budget in earlier time zones."

Google says standard delivery has been improved to be more predictive: "Standard delivery takes into account expected ad performance throughout the day and is better at maximizing performance within your daily budget."

With standard ad delivery, your budget is paced throughout the day or the periods of time you've scheduled your ads to run. Google says it "optimizes your spend to be more reflective of targeted inventory user search (eg.user searches for your product/service)," as opposed to accelerated delivery, which Google says is "less optimized."

Your options. Google recommends choosing the maximize conversions or maximize clicks bidding strategies to indicate your performance priority for campaigns that had been using accelerated delivery. And, of course, use ad scheduling to manage when your ads are shown and bid adjustments to increase and decrease bids during certain times of day. (Though Google's ad scheduling only takes your account's time zone into account.)

Why we should care. Yes, this is a loss of yet another lever and will likely be decried by many advertisers. But it's also another indication that Google believes its machine learning algorithms are now better equipped to optimize campaigns. In this case, it's saying it can better optimize ad delivery based on the advertiser's goals and query contextual signals than the relatively blunt option of showing ads as often and early as possible. Time will tell for those currently using accelerated delivery. Start preparing for this change now.



About The Author

Ginny Marvin is Third Door Media's Editor-in-Chief, managing day-to-day editorial operations across all of our publications. Ginny writes about paid online marketing topics including paid search, paid social, display and retargeting for Search Engine Land, Marketing Land and MarTech Today. With more than 15 years of marketing experience, she has held both in-house and agency management positions. She can be found on Twitter as @ginnymarvin.

How small businesses can break through on Google - The Philadelphia Inquirer

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 08:39 AM PDT

The search engine giant, according to Moz, a research and consulting firm that offers tools and information for the search industry, says that more than 90 percent of online searches are done on a Google property, which includes Gmail, YouTube, and any device running the Android operating system. So to succeed in getting your business found online, you must deal with Google. Unfortunately, that takes money and time, which most small businesses lack, particularly when competing against larger brands.

Are SKAGs dead after Google’s latest match type changes? - Search Engine Land

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 05:00 AM PDT

Google recently announced that same-meaning close variants will soon apply to phrase match and modified broad match keywords. These match types join exact match, which was the first to start showing ads for close variants with the same meaning in September 2018.

I've shared what I believe are the three most important things to do ahead of this round of changes: automate bid management, enable a nonlast-click attribution model, and set up an automated monitoring system that checks close variants. You can even grab my script to automate the monitoring process.

But will Google's change to how keyword match types work have any impact on other ways PPC accounts are managed? Or even more so, does this recent change obviate single keyword ad groups, commonly known as SKAGs? I'll explain my reasoning in this post, but if you're strapped for time, the answer I believe is that SKAGs will continue to play a useful role in boosting Quality Score, thereby reducing CPCs, and improving performance of PPC accounts.

What are SKAGs

SKAG stands for 'single keyword ad group'. As the name suggests, it's an ad group that has only one keyword in it, and often that one keyword will be an exact match keyword. For the purpose of this post, I am defining a SKAG exactly that way: an ad group with exactly one exact match keyword. This structure became popular as a way for advertisers to get more control over their accounts.

How SKAGs provide more control

Prior to the introduction of 'close variants' in 2014, using an exact match keyword meant the user had to type in exactly the same thing as the advertiser's keyword in order for the ad to be eligible to appear. Thus by having only a single exact match keyword in an ad group, it meant the advertiser knew exactly what the user searched and so they could write a super targeted and relevant ad for that user's search. 

SKAGs boost relevance and Quality Score

Having this control over ad relevance helped advertisers boost their Quality Score (QS). By focusing on a single keyword at a time, advertisers could write more compelling ads, thereby boosting CTR and hence achieving a higher QS.

And as I've written before, QS is a big part of how Google determines the Ad Rank and can make clicks cheaper when the QS increases.

"Ad Rank is a calculation of max CPC, quality score (expected CTR, ad relevance, landing page experience), the expected impact of ad extensions and ad formats as well as other contextual factors like location and device. It determines if your ad is eligible to show and where it appears on the page relative to other ads."

Google

What makes close variants the enemy of SKAGs

The meaning of match types has been radically redefined by close variants where exact match keywords no longer mean that the user's query must be an exact letter-for-letter match to the advertiser's keyword for an ad to show.

Advertisers can no longer write an ad that is guaranteed to show for exactly one query. So it seems that the point of doing SKAGs has been made impossible by Google. But while control has been reduced, SKAGs still help indicate advertiser preferences and hence can still boost QS and reduce PPC costs.

What remains the same: SKAGs help control which ad is shown

Here's the thing, an exact match keyword is supposed to be given preference in the ad serving priority over another keyword that is a same-meaning close variant match of the user's search. This has not changed. An advertiser who wants to show a specific ad for a specific query can still put that query as an exact match keyword in a SKAG and know that it is as likely as before to trigger the intended ad and deliver the associated quality score benefits.

Long-term PPC pros may argue with that point because as we all learn after doing PPC for a long time, the ad prioritization algorithm is tricky and can't be entirely relied on. This is why my company Optmyzr has long had optimization tools to add negative keywords automatically when it is found that Google is serving a different ad than the one intended by the advertiser.

But the complexity and reliability of this process aside, the introduction of close variants hasn't changed how Google picks the keyword that enters the auction when there are multiple possibilities. To understand this better, read Ginny Marvin's recent explanation of keyword prioritization.

What has changed: SKAGs need to be managed like non-SKAGs

What has changed is that SKAGs now need to be managed a bit more like non-SKAGs because the exact match keyword can all of a sudden show ads for a wider variety of queries than before.

Advertisers can control which ad will show for a particular query by adding that query as an exact match keyword in a SKAG, but they cannot control for which additional close variants that same ad may now also get triggered without adding a lot of negative keywords.

The query management process that used to only apply to broad, modified broad and phrase match keywords is now equally important for exact match keywords in single keyword ad groups.

Query management in a close variant world

The reason Google has so many match types to choose from is that they know it's near impossible for advertisers to guess all the unique ways users will formulate queries, even when looking for the same thing. Providing only exact match keywords would lead to many missed advertising opportunities.

Google has said since 2003 that 15% of queries are unique and they reaffirmed this stat with data from May 2019. That stat doesn't actually mean what you might think though; the 2019 stat says that on any given day 15% of queries happen only once. In the past, that stat applied to longer windows of time, sometimes 90 days. So there are actually fewer unique searches now than in the past and that may have something to do with autocomplete but that's a whole different topic.

In the end, it's still an important stat because even if you were able to add every possible keyword to your account, some keywords would be disabled for low search volume. And some advertisers would run into keyword limits for their accounts. So whether we like it or not, everyone has to rely on Google's algorithms at some level to show ads for all relevant searches.

But that doesn't mean advertisers should stop managing keywords and queries and just depend on Google. PPC pros should look at the search terms reports to identify queries to add as negative or positive keywords.

I covered this in my book, Digital Marketing in an AI World. Even when so much is automated, some PPC tasks remain important enough for human oversight – I describe this as the PPC pro playing a role similar to that of airline pilots.

Do I still manage keywords when Google seems to automate it all?

Let me explain why query management is still critical by providing the possible counter-argument. One could say negative keywords are not important when using smart bidding because the Google system automatically deprioritize queries that don't lead to conversions by setting lower bids and that would cause bad search terms to stop triggering ads. Likewise, it could be argued the Google system for close variants is so good at identifying relevant queries that it's no longer important to spend time developing good keyword lists. 'Why bother if Google won't respect exact match keywords anyway?' one could say.

But over-reliance on these automations may be risky. Consider that Google changes its algorithms and thresholds periodically. This means that what is considered "same-meaning" today may not tomorrow.

Another risk is conversion tracking may break, or bad data may enter the system due to technical issues like a landing page outage. Automations depend on good data to make good decisions and even the best PPC experts can't guarantee with 100% confidence that their data will always be good. There are too many external factors and other players involved.

Only by explicitly telling Google which queries you want your ad to show for, and which other ones are unlikely to lead to a high-quality lead, can you provide a level of safety against the aforementioned issues.

As part of day-to-day query management which I believe is still an important task despite all Google's automations, once you identify a great new keyword in a search terms report, it may make sense to add it as a keyword so you won't have to depend on continued traffic for this important search term by hoping Google's machine learning continues to guess it is relevant. Better still, by adding it in a SKAG with an ad written for just this term, its QS can be boosted and it may achieve a higher ad rank than when it triggered ads as a close variant match to another keyword. 

SKAGs need RSAs too

The purpose of a SKAG has always been to drive better QS with more relevant ads, and that hasn't changed. The tools to do so, however, have. This has nothing to do with close variants, but everything to do with automated ads such as responsive search ads (RSAs).

Advertisers should add RSAs across all ad groups to drive more volume and better relevance. You can read more about how RSAs drive incremental volume and how to monitor their performance against expanded text ads.

Historically SKAGs have had several purpose-written expanded text ads to drive the best possible results for a single keyword. SKAGs should continue to contain these types of text ads. The text should still be written for the keyword without concern for the other queries it could now trigger due to same-meaning close variants. Continued query management as described above will ensure that good new queries get moved into their own SKAGs where they can also have a purpose-written, QS-boosting ad.

So won't adding a responsive search ad to a SKAG dilute those QS benefits? It may seem so because RSAs are another example of advertisers ceding control to the machines. But the goal of RSAs is to show the most relevant ad so its goals are aligned with those of advertisers using SKAGs to improve QS.

When writing the components of the RSA (up to 15 headline variations and 4 descriptions), use ad text components that specifically reference the keyword itself as well as its benefits to users who did that particular search.

The advertiser's task remains to write compelling text, it's just that the text no longer has to be locked into a set order and the machines can recombine it in a way to maximize results.

Conclusion

SKAGs, or single keyword ad groups with one exact match keyword, continue to help advertisers craft a unique message for specific search terms. This can boost ad relevance, one of the components of Quality Score which can, in turn, reduce advertising costs.

Because exact match keywords may now trigger ads for a whole slew of same-meaning close variants, SKAGs now require search term management, something that wasn't the case prior to 2014.

PPC pros who have used SKAGs before can continue to use them for the same purpose but can now leverage new ad formats like RSAs to further boost auction-time relevance.

So that's the bottom-line, if you believed in SKAGs before, there's no reason to stop believing in them now.


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.



About The Author

Frederick ("Fred") Vallaeys was one of the first 500 employees at Google where he spent 10 years building AdWords and teaching advertisers how to get the most out of it as the Google AdWords Evangelist. Today he is the Cofounder of Optmyzr, an AdWords tool company focused on unique data insights, One-Click Optimizations™, advanced reporting to make account management more efficient, and Enhanced Scripts™ for AdWords. He stays up-to-speed with best practices through his work with SalesX, a search marketing agency focused on turning clicks into revenue. He is a frequent guest speaker at events where he inspires organizations to be more innovative and become better online marketers.

Fact-Checking Trump’s Claim That Google ‘Manipulated’ Millions of Votes for Clinton - The New York Times


Fact-Checking Trump’s Claim That Google ‘Manipulated’ Millions of Votes for Clinton - The New York Times

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 03:04 PM PDT

What President Trump Said

Mr. Trump lost the popular vote by almost 2.9 million in the 2016 election and has long attributed this loss to baseless claims of voter fraud. Now Mr. Trump suggests that he would have lost the popular vote by a much smaller margin, or even won it, were it not for Google's machinations.

He appears to be referring to a disputed estimate given by Robert Epstein, a psychologist and former editor in chief at Psychology Today who says he supported and voted for Hillary Clinton.

In a 2017 white paper, Mr. Epstein examined how Google Search might have influenced undecided voters in the 2016 election by providing more positive results for one candidate than the other. He estimated that the search results may have swayed "at least 2.6 million votes to Clinton." When he testified to Congress this summer, Mr. Epstein added that the estimate was a "rock bottom minimum" and that up to 10.4 million votes could have been shifted to Mrs. Clinton.

In an interview, Mr. Epstein took issue with Mr. Trump's characterization of his work.

"I've never said Google manipulated the 2016 elections," he said. "The range of numbers he listed in the tweet is also incorrect."

Panagiotis Metaxas, a computer science professor at Wellesley College, emphasized that the white paper showed a possibility — "what such an influence could have been if Google was manipulating its electoral search results" — not a conclusive fact.

"I and other researchers who have been auditing search results for years know that this did not happen," Mr. Metaxas said. "I think that, in his congressional hearing, Dr. Epstein is misrepresenting the situation."

He noted that Google does "sanitize" its search results, prioritizing more trusted sources while devaluing low-quality information sources. (Here's a more detailed explanation of how Google Search works.)

The white paper also came with huge caveats. First, it was not peer-reviewed or rigorously evaluated by other researchers.

It was based on the daily online searches of just 95 participants, 21 of whom were self-described undecided voters — a small sample size to extrapolate to millions of voters, experts said. (Mr. Epstein says that the statistical significance of his findings was high.)

Their election-related search results were then given to another group of people who evaluated whether the results were biased toward Mr. Trump or Mrs. Clinton, and concluded that most favored Mrs. Clinton. Searches conducted on other websites like Yahoo and Bing did not display the same bias, according to the paper.

Then, Mr. Epstein applied his previous research demonstrating that biased search results could shift voting preferences by 20 percent or more to reach his baseline estimate of 2.6 million people affected.

But it takes "a leap of faith" to connect Mr. Epstein's experimental results to actual election outcomes, said Nicholas Diakopoulos, an assistant professor in communication studies at Northwestern University. (Mr. Diakopoulos's own research does show that Google Search results favor Democrats.)

"There's a substantial shift in context, and a difference in asking someone in an experiment about likely voting behavior and how they might actually act during an election," Mr. Diakopoulos said.

A more meticulous scientific analysis measuring the impact of Google Search on election outcomes could, for example, take into account voter history or other sources of election information.

Given the difficulties in disaggregating the impact of Google and the paper's lack of methodological detail, Mr. Diakopoulos said, "I am skeptical of the validity of the estimates."

Curious about the accuracy of a claim? Email factcheck@nytimes.com.

Google Ads to remove accelerated ad delivery option next month - Search Engine Land

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 11:02 AM PDT

Google Ads announced a coming change to ad delivery options that will start September 17. The accelerated delivery option will be removed and standard delivery will be the only option for Search and Shopping campaigns, as well as for campaigns with shared budgets.

Automatic switch by October 1. Any Search or Shopping campaigns and shared budgets using accelerated delivery will be switched over to standard delivery automatically by October 1.

The accelerated delivery option will still be available for Display and Video campaigns, Google said.

Why the change? Advertisers typically opt for accelerated delivery when the goal is to drive as many conversions as possible within a target cost per conversion. This is particularly common for e-commerce advertisers that are willing to spend as much as possible as long as their margins make sense. They choose the accelerated delivery option and set their daily budgets high enough to ensure their ads are served as often as possible throughout the entire day. It's been a particularly popular option for Shopping campaigns.

However, Google says, the way that accelerated delivery works can make it an inefficient option. Obviously, if you do have a capped daily budget, choosing the accelerated option can mean your ads stop serving well before the day ends. But Google also notes, "this method can increase CPCs due to increased competition early in the day, or unintentionally spend most of your budget in earlier time zones."

Google says standard delivery has been improved to be more predictive: "Standard delivery takes into account expected ad performance throughout the day and is better at maximizing performance within your daily budget."

With standard ad delivery, your budget is paced throughout the day or the periods of time you've scheduled your ads to run. Google says it "optimizes your spend to be more reflective of targeted inventory user search (eg.user searches for your product/service)," as opposed to accelerated delivery, which Google says is "less optimized."

Your options. Google recommends choosing the maximize conversions or maximize clicks bidding strategies to indicate your performance priority for campaigns that had been using accelerated delivery. And, of course, use ad scheduling to manage when your ads are shown and bid adjustments to increase and decrease bids during certain times of day. (Though Google's ad scheduling only takes your account's time zone into account.)

Why we should care. Yes, this is a loss of yet another lever and will likely be decried by many advertisers. But it's also another indication that Google believes its machine learning algorithms are now better equipped to optimize campaigns. In this case, it's saying it can better optimize ad delivery based on the advertiser's goals and query contextual signals than the relatively blunt option of showing ads as often and early as possible. Time will tell for those currently using accelerated delivery. Start preparing for this change now.



About The Author

Ginny Marvin is Third Door Media's Editor-in-Chief, managing day-to-day editorial operations across all of our publications. Ginny writes about paid online marketing topics including paid search, paid social, display and retargeting for Search Engine Land, Marketing Land and MarTech Today. With more than 15 years of marketing experience, she has held both in-house and agency management positions. She can be found on Twitter as @ginnymarvin.

How small businesses can break through on Google - The Philadelphia Inquirer

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 08:39 AM PDT

The search engine giant, according to Moz, a research and consulting firm that offers tools and information for the search industry, says that more than 90 percent of online searches are done on a Google property, which includes Gmail, YouTube, and any device running the Android operating system. So to succeed in getting your business found online, you must deal with Google. Unfortunately, that takes money and time, which most small businesses lack, particularly when competing against larger brands.

Are SKAGs dead after Google’s latest match type changes? - Search Engine Land

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 05:00 AM PDT

Google recently announced that same-meaning close variants will soon apply to phrase match and modified broad match keywords. These match types join exact match, which was the first to start showing ads for close variants with the same meaning in September 2018.

I've shared what I believe are the three most important things to do ahead of this round of changes: automate bid management, enable a nonlast-click attribution model, and set up an automated monitoring system that checks close variants. You can even grab my script to automate the monitoring process.

But will Google's change to how keyword match types work have any impact on other ways PPC accounts are managed? Or even more so, does this recent change obviate single keyword ad groups, commonly known as SKAGs? I'll explain my reasoning in this post, but if you're strapped for time, the answer I believe is that SKAGs will continue to play a useful role in boosting Quality Score, thereby reducing CPCs, and improving performance of PPC accounts.

What are SKAGs

SKAG stands for 'single keyword ad group'. As the name suggests, it's an ad group that has only one keyword in it, and often that one keyword will be an exact match keyword. For the purpose of this post, I am defining a SKAG exactly that way: an ad group with exactly one exact match keyword. This structure became popular as a way for advertisers to get more control over their accounts.

How SKAGs provide more control

Prior to the introduction of 'close variants' in 2014, using an exact match keyword meant the user had to type in exactly the same thing as the advertiser's keyword in order for the ad to be eligible to appear. Thus by having only a single exact match keyword in an ad group, it meant the advertiser knew exactly what the user searched and so they could write a super targeted and relevant ad for that user's search. 

SKAGs boost relevance and Quality Score

Having this control over ad relevance helped advertisers boost their Quality Score (QS). By focusing on a single keyword at a time, advertisers could write more compelling ads, thereby boosting CTR and hence achieving a higher QS.

And as I've written before, QS is a big part of how Google determines the Ad Rank and can make clicks cheaper when the QS increases.

"Ad Rank is a calculation of max CPC, quality score (expected CTR, ad relevance, landing page experience), the expected impact of ad extensions and ad formats as well as other contextual factors like location and device. It determines if your ad is eligible to show and where it appears on the page relative to other ads."

Google

What makes close variants the enemy of SKAGs

The meaning of match types has been radically redefined by close variants where exact match keywords no longer mean that the user's query must be an exact letter-for-letter match to the advertiser's keyword for an ad to show.

Advertisers can no longer write an ad that is guaranteed to show for exactly one query. So it seems that the point of doing SKAGs has been made impossible by Google. But while control has been reduced, SKAGs still help indicate advertiser preferences and hence can still boost QS and reduce PPC costs.

What remains the same: SKAGs help control which ad is shown

Here's the thing, an exact match keyword is supposed to be given preference in the ad serving priority over another keyword that is a same-meaning close variant match of the user's search. This has not changed. An advertiser who wants to show a specific ad for a specific query can still put that query as an exact match keyword in a SKAG and know that it is as likely as before to trigger the intended ad and deliver the associated quality score benefits.

Long-term PPC pros may argue with that point because as we all learn after doing PPC for a long time, the ad prioritization algorithm is tricky and can't be entirely relied on. This is why my company Optmyzr has long had optimization tools to add negative keywords automatically when it is found that Google is serving a different ad than the one intended by the advertiser.

But the complexity and reliability of this process aside, the introduction of close variants hasn't changed how Google picks the keyword that enters the auction when there are multiple possibilities. To understand this better, read Ginny Marvin's recent explanation of keyword prioritization.

What has changed: SKAGs need to be managed like non-SKAGs

What has changed is that SKAGs now need to be managed a bit more like non-SKAGs because the exact match keyword can all of a sudden show ads for a wider variety of queries than before.

Advertisers can control which ad will show for a particular query by adding that query as an exact match keyword in a SKAG, but they cannot control for which additional close variants that same ad may now also get triggered without adding a lot of negative keywords.

The query management process that used to only apply to broad, modified broad and phrase match keywords is now equally important for exact match keywords in single keyword ad groups.

Query management in a close variant world

The reason Google has so many match types to choose from is that they know it's near impossible for advertisers to guess all the unique ways users will formulate queries, even when looking for the same thing. Providing only exact match keywords would lead to many missed advertising opportunities.

Google has said since 2003 that 15% of queries are unique and they reaffirmed this stat with data from May 2019. That stat doesn't actually mean what you might think though; the 2019 stat says that on any given day 15% of queries happen only once. In the past, that stat applied to longer windows of time, sometimes 90 days. So there are actually fewer unique searches now than in the past and that may have something to do with autocomplete but that's a whole different topic.

In the end, it's still an important stat because even if you were able to add every possible keyword to your account, some keywords would be disabled for low search volume. And some advertisers would run into keyword limits for their accounts. So whether we like it or not, everyone has to rely on Google's algorithms at some level to show ads for all relevant searches.

But that doesn't mean advertisers should stop managing keywords and queries and just depend on Google. PPC pros should look at the search terms reports to identify queries to add as negative or positive keywords.

I covered this in my book, Digital Marketing in an AI World. Even when so much is automated, some PPC tasks remain important enough for human oversight – I describe this as the PPC pro playing a role similar to that of airline pilots.

Do I still manage keywords when Google seems to automate it all?

Let me explain why query management is still critical by providing the possible counter-argument. One could say negative keywords are not important when using smart bidding because the Google system automatically deprioritize queries that don't lead to conversions by setting lower bids and that would cause bad search terms to stop triggering ads. Likewise, it could be argued the Google system for close variants is so good at identifying relevant queries that it's no longer important to spend time developing good keyword lists. 'Why bother if Google won't respect exact match keywords anyway?' one could say.

But over-reliance on these automations may be risky. Consider that Google changes its algorithms and thresholds periodically. This means that what is considered "same-meaning" today may not tomorrow.

Another risk is conversion tracking may break, or bad data may enter the system due to technical issues like a landing page outage. Automations depend on good data to make good decisions and even the best PPC experts can't guarantee with 100% confidence that their data will always be good. There are too many external factors and other players involved.

Only by explicitly telling Google which queries you want your ad to show for, and which other ones are unlikely to lead to a high-quality lead, can you provide a level of safety against the aforementioned issues.

As part of day-to-day query management which I believe is still an important task despite all Google's automations, once you identify a great new keyword in a search terms report, it may make sense to add it as a keyword so you won't have to depend on continued traffic for this important search term by hoping Google's machine learning continues to guess it is relevant. Better still, by adding it in a SKAG with an ad written for just this term, its QS can be boosted and it may achieve a higher ad rank than when it triggered ads as a close variant match to another keyword. 

SKAGs need RSAs too

The purpose of a SKAG has always been to drive better QS with more relevant ads, and that hasn't changed. The tools to do so, however, have. This has nothing to do with close variants, but everything to do with automated ads such as responsive search ads (RSAs).

Advertisers should add RSAs across all ad groups to drive more volume and better relevance. You can read more about how RSAs drive incremental volume and how to monitor their performance against expanded text ads.

Historically SKAGs have had several purpose-written expanded text ads to drive the best possible results for a single keyword. SKAGs should continue to contain these types of text ads. The text should still be written for the keyword without concern for the other queries it could now trigger due to same-meaning close variants. Continued query management as described above will ensure that good new queries get moved into their own SKAGs where they can also have a purpose-written, QS-boosting ad.

So won't adding a responsive search ad to a SKAG dilute those QS benefits? It may seem so because RSAs are another example of advertisers ceding control to the machines. But the goal of RSAs is to show the most relevant ad so its goals are aligned with those of advertisers using SKAGs to improve QS.

When writing the components of the RSA (up to 15 headline variations and 4 descriptions), use ad text components that specifically reference the keyword itself as well as its benefits to users who did that particular search.

The advertiser's task remains to write compelling text, it's just that the text no longer has to be locked into a set order and the machines can recombine it in a way to maximize results.

Conclusion

SKAGs, or single keyword ad groups with one exact match keyword, continue to help advertisers craft a unique message for specific search terms. This can boost ad relevance, one of the components of Quality Score which can, in turn, reduce advertising costs.

Because exact match keywords may now trigger ads for a whole slew of same-meaning close variants, SKAGs now require search term management, something that wasn't the case prior to 2014.

PPC pros who have used SKAGs before can continue to use them for the same purpose but can now leverage new ad formats like RSAs to further boost auction-time relevance.

So that's the bottom-line, if you believed in SKAGs before, there's no reason to stop believing in them now.


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.



About The Author

Frederick ("Fred") Vallaeys was one of the first 500 employees at Google where he spent 10 years building AdWords and teaching advertisers how to get the most out of it as the Google AdWords Evangelist. Today he is the Cofounder of Optmyzr, an AdWords tool company focused on unique data insights, One-Click Optimizations™, advanced reporting to make account management more efficient, and Enhanced Scripts™ for AdWords. He stays up-to-speed with best practices through his work with SalesX, a search marketing agency focused on turning clicks into revenue. He is a frequent guest speaker at events where he inspires organizations to be more innovative and become better online marketers.

Google Analytics Specialist - Neighborhoods.com - Built In Chicago

Google Analytics Specialist - Neighborhoods.com - Built In Chicago


Google Analytics Specialist - Neighborhoods.com - Built In Chicago

Posted: 13 Aug 2019 04:52 PM PDT

Neighborhoods.com is seeking diligent and detail-oriented Google Analytics Specialist to join our team in Chicago's vibrant Fulton River District neighborhood. This position will be responsible for measuring, testing, and analyzing digital data for the company's two brands in order to improve online reach, strengthen engagement and support larger marketing and business objectives. 

Neighborhoods.com is the first online real estate resource to put the neighborhood at the center of the home search. The platform invites visitors to imagine their life in a new area by providing a local's perspective, including detailed descriptions and resident reviews of schools, amenities, and the surrounding community. With up-to-date listings, the company offers aspiring homeowners accurate and reliable information about market changes and new homes for sale. Neighborhoods.com and its network of real estate agents are licensed and knowledgeable experts that guide users through every step of the homebuying process—from the initial search to the closing table.

What you'll be doing as our Google Analytics Specialist: 

  • Performing measurement, analysis and reporting of web and campaign performance metrics from Google Analytics and major ad serving platforms.
  • Defining and maintaining core competencies, best practices and benchmarks surrounding digital analytics.
  • Identifying opportunities for optimization of web sites, email campaign, and SEO/SEM programs. 
  • Developing on-going and ad-hoc reports to track key performance metrics. 
  • Developing acquisition, retention, activation, and lead generation suggestions based on analytics data. 
  • Tracking, assessing and reporting customer user journeys to determine the strongest path to conversion and purchase, to develop actionable insights/actions and testing strategies to increase traffic and increase conversions
  • Supporting implementation and customization of third-party analytics software. Recommend changes to wireframes, concepts and campaign messages based on analytics data.

We think you could be really successful if you:

  • Have a curious mind and aren't afraid to bring big ideas to the table
  • Maintain positive energy in a team environment
  • Can handle multiple projects and manage deadlines
  • Are a team player, but also a self-starter who goes above and beyond the task at hand 

Basic requirements to do the job:

  • 3-5 years experience in Analytics 
  • Reporting and analytics skills using SQL, Python, Excel, Google Sheets, Google Data Studio
  • Understanding of digital analytics tools, such as Google Analytics
  • Understanding of optimization and targeting tools, such as Omniture Test & Target, Google Website Optimizer, and others
  • Ability to define A/B/n and multivariate test scenarios and success metrics.
  • Able to read/write basic HTML and Javascript and query databases with SQL
  • Ability to derive and present insights from data with a strong focus on storytelling.
  • Proven track record of success with metric-driven results

Bonus Points if you have:

  • An advanced degree in Marketing, Economics, Data Science, or Information Technology

Why Neighborhoods.com?

  • The standards: insurance, 401k with match, flexible PTO, and casual dress code
  • Paid parental leave
  • Pre-tax commuter program
  • West Loop neighborhood (easy commute and lots of food options)
  • Volunteer and charity opportunities
  • Cold-brew coffee on tap
  • Transparent and approachable leadership and management
  • Help make a difference in the lives of homeowners across the country

Neighborhoods.com is an equal opportunity employer, of people from all different backgrounds, ethnicities, races, colors, religions, sexual orientations, gender identities, and ages. We strive to foster an inclusive environment, that is comfortable for everyone. We will not tolerate harassment or discrimination of any kind.

We are interested in every qualified candidate who is eligible to work in the United States. However, we are not able to sponsor visas.

Google Analytics Specialist - Neighborhoods.com - Built In Chicago


Google Analytics Specialist - Neighborhoods.com - Built In Chicago

Posted: 13 Aug 2019 04:52 PM PDT

Neighborhoods.com is seeking diligent and detail-oriented Google Analytics Specialist to join our team in Chicago's vibrant Fulton River District neighborhood. This position will be responsible for measuring, testing, and analyzing digital data for the company's two brands in order to improve online reach, strengthen engagement and support larger marketing and business objectives. 

Neighborhoods.com is the first online real estate resource to put the neighborhood at the center of the home search. The platform invites visitors to imagine their life in a new area by providing a local's perspective, including detailed descriptions and resident reviews of schools, amenities, and the surrounding community. With up-to-date listings, the company offers aspiring homeowners accurate and reliable information about market changes and new homes for sale. Neighborhoods.com and its network of real estate agents are licensed and knowledgeable experts that guide users through every step of the homebuying process—from the initial search to the closing table.

What you'll be doing as our Google Analytics Specialist: 

  • Performing measurement, analysis and reporting of web and campaign performance metrics from Google Analytics and major ad serving platforms.
  • Defining and maintaining core competencies, best practices and benchmarks surrounding digital analytics.
  • Identifying opportunities for optimization of web sites, email campaign, and SEO/SEM programs. 
  • Developing on-going and ad-hoc reports to track key performance metrics. 
  • Developing acquisition, retention, activation, and lead generation suggestions based on analytics data. 
  • Tracking, assessing and reporting customer user journeys to determine the strongest path to conversion and purchase, to develop actionable insights/actions and testing strategies to increase traffic and increase conversions
  • Supporting implementation and customization of third-party analytics software. Recommend changes to wireframes, concepts and campaign messages based on analytics data.

We think you could be really successful if you:

  • Have a curious mind and aren't afraid to bring big ideas to the table
  • Maintain positive energy in a team environment
  • Can handle multiple projects and manage deadlines
  • Are a team player, but also a self-starter who goes above and beyond the task at hand 

Basic requirements to do the job:

  • 3-5 years experience in Analytics 
  • Reporting and analytics skills using SQL, Python, Excel, Google Sheets, Google Data Studio
  • Understanding of digital analytics tools, such as Google Analytics
  • Understanding of optimization and targeting tools, such as Omniture Test & Target, Google Website Optimizer, and others
  • Ability to define A/B/n and multivariate test scenarios and success metrics.
  • Able to read/write basic HTML and Javascript and query databases with SQL
  • Ability to derive and present insights from data with a strong focus on storytelling.
  • Proven track record of success with metric-driven results

Bonus Points if you have:

  • An advanced degree in Marketing, Economics, Data Science, or Information Technology

Why Neighborhoods.com?

  • The standards: insurance, 401k with match, flexible PTO, and casual dress code
  • Paid parental leave
  • Pre-tax commuter program
  • West Loop neighborhood (easy commute and lots of food options)
  • Volunteer and charity opportunities
  • Cold-brew coffee on tap
  • Transparent and approachable leadership and management
  • Help make a difference in the lives of homeowners across the country

Neighborhoods.com is an equal opportunity employer, of people from all different backgrounds, ethnicities, races, colors, religions, sexual orientations, gender identities, and ages. We strive to foster an inclusive environment, that is comfortable for everyone. We will not tolerate harassment or discrimination of any kind.

We are interested in every qualified candidate who is eligible to work in the United States. However, we are not able to sponsor visas.

Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course - Mashable

Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course - Mashable


Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course - Mashable

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 10:03 AM PDT

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

Image: pixabay

TL;DR: Get access to a comprehensive online course on Google AdWords for $12.99. Since it's usually $199.99, you'll be saving 93% while growing your business. 


When it comes to online discovery, Google Search reigns king. At the core of Google Search is the ability for people to find where to go, what to do, and what to buy, making it one of the most important ad platforms out there.  

And if you're in the business of attracting customers to your website, you could be missing out on thousands, if not millions, of prospective customers if you aren't optimizing specifically for the search engine. 

Google AdWords is a way for businesses to grow sales and overall customer engagement by targeting valuable, qualified users. 

For those who need help mastering the art of the perfect Google AdWords campaign, The Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords is a pretty solid place to start. This in-depth course covers 70 lectures and 18 hours of content taught by Isaac Rudansky, founder of AdVenture Media. Rudansky has consulted with over 450 companies from around the world and his bestselling online marketing courses have been used by over 85,000 students from across the globe. 

This crash course gives you insights into what keywords you should use to your advantage, how to optimize your Google AdWords campaign to get the most bang for your buck, and what features on the platform, such as tracking sales and revenue, could be invaluable to your goals. 

Oh yeah, did we mention you get all of this expert know-how for just $12.99? Right now you can score the entire course for 93% off its original price tag in the Mashable Shop.



Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course

Search Advertising Software Market in-Depth Analysis with key players | WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite - Indian Columnist

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 04:45 AM PDT

A new business intelligence report released by HTF MI with title "Search Advertising Software Market Insights 2019, Global and Chinese Analysis and Forecast to 2024" has abilities to raise as the most significant market worldwide as it has remained playing a remarkable role in establishing progressive impacts on the universal economy. The Search Advertising Software Market survey analysis offers energetic visions to conclude and study market size, market hopes, and competitive surroundings. The research is derived through primary and secondary statistics sources and it comprises both qualitative and quantitative detailing. Some of the key players profiled in the study are WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio.

What's keeping WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio, Company Profile, Main Business Information, SWOT Analysis, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Market Share, Cloud-based & On-premises Ahead in the Market? Benchmark yourself with the strategic moves and findings recently released by HTF MI

Get Free Sample Report + All Related Graphs & Charts @: https://www.htfmarketreport.com/sample-report/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Market Overview of Search Advertising Software
If you are involved in the Search Advertising Software industry or aim to be, then this study will provide you inclusive point of view. It's vital you keep your market knowledge up to date segmented by Applications [Small Business, Medium Business & Large Enterprises], Product Types [, ] and major players. If you have a different set of players/manufacturers according to geography or needs regional or country segmented reports we can provide customization according to your requirement.

This study mainly helps understand which market segments or Region or Country they should focus in coming years to channelize their efforts and investments to maximize growth and profitability. The report presents the market competitive landscape and a consistent in depth analysis of the major vendor/key players in the market.

Furthermore, the years considered for the study are as follows:
Historical year – 2013-2017
Base year – 2018
Forecast period** – 2018 to 2023 [** unless otherwise stated]

**Moreover, it will also include the opportunities available in micro markets for stakeholders to invest, detailed analysis of competitive landscape and product services of key players.

The titled segments and sub-section of the market are illuminated below:
The Study Explore the Product Types of Search Advertising Software Market: ,

Key Applications/end-users of Search Advertising SoftwareMarket: Small Business, Medium Business & Large Enterprises

Top Players in the Market are: WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio, Company Profile, Main Business Information, SWOT Analysis, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Market Share, Cloud-based & On-premises

Region Included are: North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific etc

Enquire for customization in Report @: https://www.htfmarketreport.com/enquiry-before-buy/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Important Features that are under offering & key highlights of the report:
– Detailed overview of Search Advertising Software market
– Changing market dynamics of the industry
– In-depth market segmentation by Type, Application etc
– Historical, current and projected market size in terms of volume and value
– Recent industry trends and developments
– Competitive landscape of Search Advertising Software market
– Strategies of key players and product offerings
– Potential and niche segments/regions exhibiting promising growth
– A neutral perspective towards Search Advertising Software market performance
– Must-have information for market players to sustain and enhance their market footprint

Read Detailed Index of full Research Study at @ https://www.htfmarketreport.com/reports/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Major Highlights of TOC:
Chapter One: Search Advertising Software Market Industry Overview
1.1 Search Advertising Software Industry
1.1.1 Overview
1.1.2 Products of Major Companies
1.2 Search Advertising Software Market Segment
1.2.1 Industry Chain
1.2.2 Consumer Distribution
1.3 Price & Cost Overview

Chapter Two: Search Advertising Software Market Demand
2.1 Segment Overview
2.1.1 APPLICATION 1
2.1.2 APPLICATION 2
2.1.3 Other
2.2 Search Advertising Software Market Size by Demand
2.3 Search Advertising Software Market Forecast by Demand

Chapter Three: Search Advertising Software Market by Type
3.1 By Type
3.1.1 TYPE 1
3.1.2 TYPE 2
3.2 Search Advertising Software Market Size by Type
3.3 Search Advertising Software Market Forecast by Type

Chapter Four: Major Region of Search Advertising Software Market
4.1 Search Advertising Software Sales
4.2 Search Advertising Software Revenue & market share

Chapter Five: Major Companies List

Chapter Six: Conclusion

Buy the Latest Detailed Report @ https://www.htfmarketreport.com/buy-now?format=1&report=2008710

Key questions answered
• Who are the Leading key players and what are their Key Business plans in the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are the key concerns of the five forces analysis of the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are different prospects and threats faced by the dealers in the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?

Thanks for reading this article; you can also get individual chapter wise section or region wise report version like North America, Europe or Asia.

About Author:
HTF Market Report is a wholly owned brand of HTF market Intelligence Consulting Private Limited. HTF Market Report global research and market intelligence consulting organization is uniquely positioned to not only identify growth opportunities but to also empower and inspire you to create visionary growth strategies for futures, enabled by our extraordinary depth and breadth of thought leadership, research, tools, events and experience that assist you for making goals into a reality. Our understanding of the interplay between industry convergence, Mega Trends, technologies and market trends provides our clients with new business models and expansion opportunities. We are focused on identifying the "Accurate Forecast" in every industry we cover so our clients can reap the benefits of being early market entrants and can accomplish their "Goals & Objectives".


Contact US :
Craig Francis (PR & Marketing Manager)
HTF Market Intelligence Consulting Private Limited
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Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course - Mashable


Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course - Mashable

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 10:03 AM PDT

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

Image: pixabay

TL;DR: Get access to a comprehensive online course on Google AdWords for $12.99. Since it's usually $199.99, you'll be saving 93% while growing your business. 


When it comes to online discovery, Google Search reigns king. At the core of Google Search is the ability for people to find where to go, what to do, and what to buy, making it one of the most important ad platforms out there.  

And if you're in the business of attracting customers to your website, you could be missing out on thousands, if not millions, of prospective customers if you aren't optimizing specifically for the search engine. 

Google AdWords is a way for businesses to grow sales and overall customer engagement by targeting valuable, qualified users. 

For those who need help mastering the art of the perfect Google AdWords campaign, The Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords is a pretty solid place to start. This in-depth course covers 70 lectures and 18 hours of content taught by Isaac Rudansky, founder of AdVenture Media. Rudansky has consulted with over 450 companies from around the world and his bestselling online marketing courses have been used by over 85,000 students from across the globe. 

This crash course gives you insights into what keywords you should use to your advantage, how to optimize your Google AdWords campaign to get the most bang for your buck, and what features on the platform, such as tracking sales and revenue, could be invaluable to your goals. 

Oh yeah, did we mention you get all of this expert know-how for just $12.99? Right now you can score the entire course for 93% off its original price tag in the Mashable Shop.



Learn Google AdWords with this super cheap online course

Search Advertising Software Market in-Depth Analysis with key players | WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite - Indian Columnist

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 04:45 AM PDT

A new business intelligence report released by HTF MI with title "Search Advertising Software Market Insights 2019, Global and Chinese Analysis and Forecast to 2024" has abilities to raise as the most significant market worldwide as it has remained playing a remarkable role in establishing progressive impacts on the universal economy. The Search Advertising Software Market survey analysis offers energetic visions to conclude and study market size, market hopes, and competitive surroundings. The research is derived through primary and secondary statistics sources and it comprises both qualitative and quantitative detailing. Some of the key players profiled in the study are WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio.

What's keeping WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio, Company Profile, Main Business Information, SWOT Analysis, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Market Share, Cloud-based & On-premises Ahead in the Market? Benchmark yourself with the strategic moves and findings recently released by HTF MI

Get Free Sample Report + All Related Graphs & Charts @: https://www.htfmarketreport.com/sample-report/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Market Overview of Search Advertising Software
If you are involved in the Search Advertising Software industry or aim to be, then this study will provide you inclusive point of view. It's vital you keep your market knowledge up to date segmented by Applications [Small Business, Medium Business & Large Enterprises], Product Types [, ] and major players. If you have a different set of players/manufacturers according to geography or needs regional or country segmented reports we can provide customization according to your requirement.

This study mainly helps understand which market segments or Region or Country they should focus in coming years to channelize their efforts and investments to maximize growth and profitability. The report presents the market competitive landscape and a consistent in depth analysis of the major vendor/key players in the market.

Furthermore, the years considered for the study are as follows:
Historical year – 2013-2017
Base year – 2018
Forecast period** – 2018 to 2023 [** unless otherwise stated]

**Moreover, it will also include the opportunities available in micro markets for stakeholders to invest, detailed analysis of competitive landscape and product services of key players.

The titled segments and sub-section of the market are illuminated below:
The Study Explore the Product Types of Search Advertising Software Market: ,

Key Applications/end-users of Search Advertising SoftwareMarket: Small Business, Medium Business & Large Enterprises

Top Players in the Market are: WordStream, AdWords, Kenshoo Infinity Suite, Marin Software, DoubleClick Digital Marketing, Acquisio, Company Profile, Main Business Information, SWOT Analysis, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Market Share, Cloud-based & On-premises

Region Included are: North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific etc

Enquire for customization in Report @: https://www.htfmarketreport.com/enquiry-before-buy/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Important Features that are under offering & key highlights of the report:
– Detailed overview of Search Advertising Software market
– Changing market dynamics of the industry
– In-depth market segmentation by Type, Application etc
– Historical, current and projected market size in terms of volume and value
– Recent industry trends and developments
– Competitive landscape of Search Advertising Software market
– Strategies of key players and product offerings
– Potential and niche segments/regions exhibiting promising growth
– A neutral perspective towards Search Advertising Software market performance
– Must-have information for market players to sustain and enhance their market footprint

Read Detailed Index of full Research Study at @ https://www.htfmarketreport.com/reports/2008710-search-advertising-software-market

Major Highlights of TOC:
Chapter One: Search Advertising Software Market Industry Overview
1.1 Search Advertising Software Industry
1.1.1 Overview
1.1.2 Products of Major Companies
1.2 Search Advertising Software Market Segment
1.2.1 Industry Chain
1.2.2 Consumer Distribution
1.3 Price & Cost Overview

Chapter Two: Search Advertising Software Market Demand
2.1 Segment Overview
2.1.1 APPLICATION 1
2.1.2 APPLICATION 2
2.1.3 Other
2.2 Search Advertising Software Market Size by Demand
2.3 Search Advertising Software Market Forecast by Demand

Chapter Three: Search Advertising Software Market by Type
3.1 By Type
3.1.1 TYPE 1
3.1.2 TYPE 2
3.2 Search Advertising Software Market Size by Type
3.3 Search Advertising Software Market Forecast by Type

Chapter Four: Major Region of Search Advertising Software Market
4.1 Search Advertising Software Sales
4.2 Search Advertising Software Revenue & market share

Chapter Five: Major Companies List

Chapter Six: Conclusion

Buy the Latest Detailed Report @ https://www.htfmarketreport.com/buy-now?format=1&report=2008710

Key questions answered
• Who are the Leading key players and what are their Key Business plans in the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are the key concerns of the five forces analysis of the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are different prospects and threats faced by the dealers in the Search Advertising Software market?
• What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors?

Thanks for reading this article; you can also get individual chapter wise section or region wise report version like North America, Europe or Asia.

About Author:
HTF Market Report is a wholly owned brand of HTF market Intelligence Consulting Private Limited. HTF Market Report global research and market intelligence consulting organization is uniquely positioned to not only identify growth opportunities but to also empower and inspire you to create visionary growth strategies for futures, enabled by our extraordinary depth and breadth of thought leadership, research, tools, events and experience that assist you for making goals into a reality. Our understanding of the interplay between industry convergence, Mega Trends, technologies and market trends provides our clients with new business models and expansion opportunities. We are focused on identifying the "Accurate Forecast" in every industry we cover so our clients can reap the benefits of being early market entrants and can accomplish their "Goals & Objectives".


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“Is 2019 the year flying became uncool? | China Dialogue - chinadialogue” plus 1 more

“Is 2019 the year flying became uncool? | China Dialogue - chinadialogue” plus 1 more


Is 2019 the year flying became uncool? | China Dialogue - chinadialogue

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 09:09 AM PDT

Article image

(Image: Alamy)

Does your summer holiday involve "flygskam", or will you be taking part in "smygflyga"? Perhaps you want to be ahead of the pack and are attempting "tågskryt"?

Though the Swedish words may be unfamiliar to most, as public awareness of climate change has grown, an increasing number of people are openly talking about "flight shame", "flying in secret", and even "train bragging" on social media.

Flying is currently responsible for just over 2% of global emissions, but significant growth is projected, with the International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA) forecasting that by 2050 it could be responsible for 300-700% more carbon emissions.

Swedish schoolgirl and climate campaigner Greta Thunberg has highlighted the link between aviation emissions and climate change. Faced with a dilemma over how to attend next month's UN climate summit in New York without flying, Thunberg has opted to sail aboard Malizia II, a 60-foot racing yacht fitted with solar panels and underwater turbines to generate zero-carbon electricity. The journey will take two weeks weather-permitting.

Global climate change activists Extinction Rebellion have also made headlines about the impact of aviation, threatening to hold up flights at London's Heathrow airport with drones. The idea proved controversial and has now been officially dropped, though it warned that a number of its members may go ahead with the action independently.

Media attention on Thunberg and Extinction Rebellion has brought the issue to the forefront. According to Google Trends, which provides data on the relative popularity of search terms, flygskam was barely used prior to November 2018, but has been growing worldwide since, predominantly in Western Europe and Scandinavia, the US and Canada, and Australia.

Ditching planes for trains

Meanwhile, "tågsemester", meaning train holiday, a Facebook page created by environmentalist Susanna Elfors to give people tips on how to shift from air to rail travel, now has 100,000 members.

Movements have formed within sectors, such as the "Noflyclimatesci" group, created by climate scientist Dr Peter Kalmus to allow people who have decided to fly less to come together. It is predominantly aimed at academics, for whom flying to speak at conferences has typically been part of the job, but members of the public have also joined.

"The website gives people who are conscientiously flying less out of climate concern a chance to tell their stories, shift the culture away from flying and fossil fuels, and feel less alone. Together we are trying to shift cultural norms. Fossil fuels cause real harm, and our norms should reflect this," Kalmus says.

The website currently has around 300 academics, including 75 earth scientists and 150 members of the public, mostly from Europe. "It is growing faster than I can keep up!" Kalmus says. "After a major article mentions the site we can get dozens of new signups in a day."

The movement is making more people realise how urgent the issue of climate breakdown is, Kalmus says. "If no one acts like it's a crisis, the public won't realise that it is. Flying less is a good example of responding with appropriate urgency."

Mark Smith, also known as the Man in Seat 61, runs a website helping people find information on rail travel all over the world. He says he has noted a definite change in users of his site.

"When I started in 2001, the typical user was medically restricted or afraid of flying, or they specifically liked train travel."

"Now they typically say two things: they are fed up with the budget airline experience and they want to cut their carbon footprint. Those two things seem to go together, perhaps 80:20 in the average passenger, ranging to 20:80 in the dedicated eco-warriors," he says.

However, the industry is not making this an easy choice, he says. "The travel industry would rather that you book flights, that's what the computer in front of them will do. Agencies haven't a clue about how to book trains. It's all too difficult."

The rail industry is at best doing nothing about this, and at worst, making things more difficult, he says. For example, they tend to advertise their most expensive fares, while airlines advertise the cheapest.

"The complicated part of booking rail travel is knowing which two or three websites you need to look at. Once you know that, it's not difficult, and a lot of people are surprised at how cheap it is – there are bargains, such as Brussels to Prague for €20," he says.

Offsetting flight emissions

Another option for those concerned about the carbon footprint of their travel is offsetting. Passengers can choose to pay extra that will go towards a project reducing carbon emissions by around the same amount as that generated by their flight. Many airlines offer this, but it has not typically proved popular, with only around 1% of passengers taking it up.

Though some experts have labelled offsetting greenwashing, it is now on the rise, according to several companies selling offsets, including ClimateCare and Atmosfair. A spokesman for Swiss-based MyClimate, which offers carbon offsets for Lufthansa, Swiss airline Edelweiss, and Japan Airlines, says that growth has gone from around 15-20%, to 400% in the first six months of this year compared with the same period in 2018.

"The topic of climate protection, carbon footprint, flight shame – it is everywhere. People are discussing it with their families, and at work. But many people still want to fly, so they are looking for solutions," he says.

One reason offsetting has not been common is that many airlines do not integrate it into the booking process, keeping awareness among passengers low, he believes. The participation rate of offsetting jumped to 5% among Edelweiss' passengers when the airline offered it during booking. Other airlines doing the same could be a "gamechanger", he says.

The aviation industry has its own carbon reduction plan, which aims to ensure that the industry's growth is carbon neutral from 2020 through technological advancements in fuel and aircraft, and more efficient routing. 

However, some governments are starting to take their own action on aviation. France has announced new taxes on plane tickets of up to €18 per flight, while Sweden added a charge of up to €40 on every ticket last year. The UK government is considering automatically including the cost of carbon offsets in ticket prices, though customers would be able to opt out.

Industry rattled

The airline industry is not impressed with these actions. A spokesman for the International Air Transport Association (IATA) says: "The question is, what is the tax for? If that money was distributed to genuinely tackle aviation emissions, then we could support it, but governments are using industry as a scapegoat."

Governments could spend the money on research and development for new aviation technologies if they really wanted to make a difference, he says.

Although growth in flying has slowed slightly in recent months, the industry blames global trade tensions and weakening business confidence. "We're not seeing much of an impact from the movement to persuade people not to fly for environmental reasons," the spokesman says.

Nevertheless, the industry is showing signs of nervousness. At a press conference following the French announcement, Willie Walsh, chief executive of IAG, which owns British Airways and Iberia, said: "I am not ashamed to be in this industry." Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary said that there was a "very good case" to push back against the flight shame movement, insisting that the industry was meeting its environmental obligations.

Dutch airline KLM is running a "Fly Responsibly" campaign, which includes encouraging customers to offset their emissions, and even to replace short-haul flights with a train journey.

"The industry can't ignore what's happening, whether it's the flight shame movement that is challenging aviation directly, or the wider school strike and Extinction Rebellion protests calling for zero emissions, which will make aviation, and its growth projections, increasingly visible," says Tim Johnson, director of campaign group the Aviation Environment Federation.

"It dominated conversations at the Paris Air Show and IATA's AGM. It's too early to tell if this is a long-term trend, but the signs are that the industry is worried," he says.

Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers - iTnews

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 01:59 PM PDT

Alphabet Inc's Google has shut down a service it provided to wireless carriers globally that showed them weak spots in their network coverage, people familiar with the matter told Reuters, because of Google's concerns that sharing data from users of its Android phone system might attract the scrutiny of users and regulators.

The withdrawal of the service, which has not been previously reported, has disappointed wireless carriers that used the data as part of their decision-making process on where to extend or upgrade their coverage. Even though the data were anonymous and the sharing of it has become commonplace, Google's move illustrates how concerned the company has become about drawing attention amid a heightened focus in much of the world on data privacy.

Google's Mobile Network Insights service, which had launched in March 2017, was essentially a map showing carriers signal strengths and connection speeds they were delivering in each area.

The service was provided free to carriers and vendors that helped them manage operations. The data came from devices running Google's Android operating system, which is on about 75% of the world's smartphones, making it a valuable resource for the industry.

It used data only from users who had opted into sharing location history and usage and diagnostics with Google. The data were aggregated, meaning they did not explicitly link any information to any individual phone user. It included data relating to a carrier's own service and that of competitors, which were not identified by name.

Nevertheless, Google shut down the service in April due to concerns about data privacy, four people with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Some of them said secondary reasons likely included challenges ensuring data quality and connectivity upgrades among carriers being slow to materialize.

Google spokeswoman Victoria Keough confirmed the move but declined to elaborate, saying only that changing "product priorities" were behind it. Google's notice to carriers when it shut down the service did not specify a reason, two of the four people told Reuters.

"We worked on a program to help mobile partners improve their networks through aggregated and anonymized performance metrics," Keough said. "We remain committed to improving network performance across our apps and services for users."

Closer scrutiny

The loss of Google's service is the latest example of an internet company opting to end a data-sharing service rather than risk a breach or further scrutiny from lawmakers. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, introduced last year, prohibits companies sharing user data with third parties without users' explicit consent or a legitimate business reason.

US and European lawmakers have stepped up their focus on how tech companies treat user data after a series of large-scale data security failures and the revelation that Facebook Inc improperly shared data on 87 million of its users with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

In April, Google shut down its Video Checkup service from its YouTube operation, which it launched in mid-2017 to let customers in Malaysia compare their provider's streaming capability in a specific spot with other carriers. YouTube spokeswoman Mariana De Felice cited "relatively low user engagement" with Video Checkup for its retirement, which has not been previously reported.

Facebook has begun reviewing data deals with app developers and the four big US wireless carriers recently stopped selling data on customers' real-time locations to marketers and other firms.

Walking tightrope

Internet companies now walk a tightrope in trying to generate revenue or improve their services by supplying user data to other companies because they risk compromising – or appearing to compromise – data privacy. And companies including Google and Facebook have curtailed access to data by outside companies over the past two years.

Google's Mobile Network Insights service was not the only source of detailed customer data used by carriers to determine where cell tower upgrades are needed, but it was useful because of the sheer volume of Android phones in the market.

It was an "independent reference from the horse's mouth, so you couldn't get any better than this," said Mushil Mustafa, a former employee at Dubai-based carrier du. "But the carriers have investment in other tools, obviously."

Facebook offers a similar service, called Actionable Insights. Facebook appears committed to continuing the service but declined to comment when asked.

Data-sharing arrangements between tech companies became common over the past decade as the use of smartphones and apps exploded, but what data is collected and how it is shared is not always clear to users.

Companies often are not explicit about their data sharing. Google's data policy that Android users agree to states that it may collect and share network connection quality information. Wireless carriers had not been specifically mentioned as recipients.

As users demand greater transparency, what constitutes a violation of consumer trust is not clear.

Facebook's Actionable Insights service for carriers also includes information about users' gender, age and other characteristics collected from its apps, which helps carriers spot demographic trends to target their marketing, but it does not tie data to specific individuals.

"We have publicly announced this program and carefully designed it to protect people's privacy," said Facebook spokesman Joe Osborne, in a statement.

Google said it shared neither aggregated nor individualized data on user demographics and app usage. The company rejected requests to give equipment vendors any data, it said.

“Is 2019 the year flying became uncool? | China Dialogue - chinadialogue” plus 1 more


Is 2019 the year flying became uncool? | China Dialogue - chinadialogue

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 09:09 AM PDT

Article image

(Image: Alamy)

Does your summer holiday involve "flygskam", or will you be taking part in "smygflyga"? Perhaps you want to be ahead of the pack and are attempting "tågskryt"?

Though the Swedish words may be unfamiliar to most, as public awareness of climate change has grown, an increasing number of people are openly talking about "flight shame", "flying in secret", and even "train bragging" on social media.

Flying is currently responsible for just over 2% of global emissions, but significant growth is projected, with the International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA) forecasting that by 2050 it could be responsible for 300-700% more carbon emissions.

Swedish schoolgirl and climate campaigner Greta Thunberg has highlighted the link between aviation emissions and climate change. Faced with a dilemma over how to attend next month's UN climate summit in New York without flying, Thunberg has opted to sail aboard Malizia II, a 60-foot racing yacht fitted with solar panels and underwater turbines to generate zero-carbon electricity. The journey will take two weeks weather-permitting.

Global climate change activists Extinction Rebellion have also made headlines about the impact of aviation, threatening to hold up flights at London's Heathrow airport with drones. The idea proved controversial and has now been officially dropped, though it warned that a number of its members may go ahead with the action independently.

Media attention on Thunberg and Extinction Rebellion has brought the issue to the forefront. According to Google Trends, which provides data on the relative popularity of search terms, flygskam was barely used prior to November 2018, but has been growing worldwide since, predominantly in Western Europe and Scandinavia, the US and Canada, and Australia.

Ditching planes for trains

Meanwhile, "tågsemester", meaning train holiday, a Facebook page created by environmentalist Susanna Elfors to give people tips on how to shift from air to rail travel, now has 100,000 members.

Movements have formed within sectors, such as the "Noflyclimatesci" group, created by climate scientist Dr Peter Kalmus to allow people who have decided to fly less to come together. It is predominantly aimed at academics, for whom flying to speak at conferences has typically been part of the job, but members of the public have also joined.

"The website gives people who are conscientiously flying less out of climate concern a chance to tell their stories, shift the culture away from flying and fossil fuels, and feel less alone. Together we are trying to shift cultural norms. Fossil fuels cause real harm, and our norms should reflect this," Kalmus says.

The website currently has around 300 academics, including 75 earth scientists and 150 members of the public, mostly from Europe. "It is growing faster than I can keep up!" Kalmus says. "After a major article mentions the site we can get dozens of new signups in a day."

The movement is making more people realise how urgent the issue of climate breakdown is, Kalmus says. "If no one acts like it's a crisis, the public won't realise that it is. Flying less is a good example of responding with appropriate urgency."

Mark Smith, also known as the Man in Seat 61, runs a website helping people find information on rail travel all over the world. He says he has noted a definite change in users of his site.

"When I started in 2001, the typical user was medically restricted or afraid of flying, or they specifically liked train travel."

"Now they typically say two things: they are fed up with the budget airline experience and they want to cut their carbon footprint. Those two things seem to go together, perhaps 80:20 in the average passenger, ranging to 20:80 in the dedicated eco-warriors," he says.

However, the industry is not making this an easy choice, he says. "The travel industry would rather that you book flights, that's what the computer in front of them will do. Agencies haven't a clue about how to book trains. It's all too difficult."

The rail industry is at best doing nothing about this, and at worst, making things more difficult, he says. For example, they tend to advertise their most expensive fares, while airlines advertise the cheapest.

"The complicated part of booking rail travel is knowing which two or three websites you need to look at. Once you know that, it's not difficult, and a lot of people are surprised at how cheap it is – there are bargains, such as Brussels to Prague for €20," he says.

Offsetting flight emissions

Another option for those concerned about the carbon footprint of their travel is offsetting. Passengers can choose to pay extra that will go towards a project reducing carbon emissions by around the same amount as that generated by their flight. Many airlines offer this, but it has not typically proved popular, with only around 1% of passengers taking it up.

Though some experts have labelled offsetting greenwashing, it is now on the rise, according to several companies selling offsets, including ClimateCare and Atmosfair. A spokesman for Swiss-based MyClimate, which offers carbon offsets for Lufthansa, Swiss airline Edelweiss, and Japan Airlines, says that growth has gone from around 15-20%, to 400% in the first six months of this year compared with the same period in 2018.

"The topic of climate protection, carbon footprint, flight shame – it is everywhere. People are discussing it with their families, and at work. But many people still want to fly, so they are looking for solutions," he says.

One reason offsetting has not been common is that many airlines do not integrate it into the booking process, keeping awareness among passengers low, he believes. The participation rate of offsetting jumped to 5% among Edelweiss' passengers when the airline offered it during booking. Other airlines doing the same could be a "gamechanger", he says.

The aviation industry has its own carbon reduction plan, which aims to ensure that the industry's growth is carbon neutral from 2020 through technological advancements in fuel and aircraft, and more efficient routing. 

However, some governments are starting to take their own action on aviation. France has announced new taxes on plane tickets of up to €18 per flight, while Sweden added a charge of up to €40 on every ticket last year. The UK government is considering automatically including the cost of carbon offsets in ticket prices, though customers would be able to opt out.

Industry rattled

The airline industry is not impressed with these actions. A spokesman for the International Air Transport Association (IATA) says: "The question is, what is the tax for? If that money was distributed to genuinely tackle aviation emissions, then we could support it, but governments are using industry as a scapegoat."

Governments could spend the money on research and development for new aviation technologies if they really wanted to make a difference, he says.

Although growth in flying has slowed slightly in recent months, the industry blames global trade tensions and weakening business confidence. "We're not seeing much of an impact from the movement to persuade people not to fly for environmental reasons," the spokesman says.

Nevertheless, the industry is showing signs of nervousness. At a press conference following the French announcement, Willie Walsh, chief executive of IAG, which owns British Airways and Iberia, said: "I am not ashamed to be in this industry." Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary said that there was a "very good case" to push back against the flight shame movement, insisting that the industry was meeting its environmental obligations.

Dutch airline KLM is running a "Fly Responsibly" campaign, which includes encouraging customers to offset their emissions, and even to replace short-haul flights with a train journey.

"The industry can't ignore what's happening, whether it's the flight shame movement that is challenging aviation directly, or the wider school strike and Extinction Rebellion protests calling for zero emissions, which will make aviation, and its growth projections, increasingly visible," says Tim Johnson, director of campaign group the Aviation Environment Federation.

"It dominated conversations at the Paris Air Show and IATA's AGM. It's too early to tell if this is a long-term trend, but the signs are that the industry is worried," he says.

Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers - iTnews

Posted: 19 Aug 2019 01:59 PM PDT

Alphabet Inc's Google has shut down a service it provided to wireless carriers globally that showed them weak spots in their network coverage, people familiar with the matter told Reuters, because of Google's concerns that sharing data from users of its Android phone system might attract the scrutiny of users and regulators.

The withdrawal of the service, which has not been previously reported, has disappointed wireless carriers that used the data as part of their decision-making process on where to extend or upgrade their coverage. Even though the data were anonymous and the sharing of it has become commonplace, Google's move illustrates how concerned the company has become about drawing attention amid a heightened focus in much of the world on data privacy.

Google's Mobile Network Insights service, which had launched in March 2017, was essentially a map showing carriers signal strengths and connection speeds they were delivering in each area.

The service was provided free to carriers and vendors that helped them manage operations. The data came from devices running Google's Android operating system, which is on about 75% of the world's smartphones, making it a valuable resource for the industry.

It used data only from users who had opted into sharing location history and usage and diagnostics with Google. The data were aggregated, meaning they did not explicitly link any information to any individual phone user. It included data relating to a carrier's own service and that of competitors, which were not identified by name.

Nevertheless, Google shut down the service in April due to concerns about data privacy, four people with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters. Some of them said secondary reasons likely included challenges ensuring data quality and connectivity upgrades among carriers being slow to materialize.

Google spokeswoman Victoria Keough confirmed the move but declined to elaborate, saying only that changing "product priorities" were behind it. Google's notice to carriers when it shut down the service did not specify a reason, two of the four people told Reuters.

"We worked on a program to help mobile partners improve their networks through aggregated and anonymized performance metrics," Keough said. "We remain committed to improving network performance across our apps and services for users."

Closer scrutiny

The loss of Google's service is the latest example of an internet company opting to end a data-sharing service rather than risk a breach or further scrutiny from lawmakers. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, introduced last year, prohibits companies sharing user data with third parties without users' explicit consent or a legitimate business reason.

US and European lawmakers have stepped up their focus on how tech companies treat user data after a series of large-scale data security failures and the revelation that Facebook Inc improperly shared data on 87 million of its users with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

In April, Google shut down its Video Checkup service from its YouTube operation, which it launched in mid-2017 to let customers in Malaysia compare their provider's streaming capability in a specific spot with other carriers. YouTube spokeswoman Mariana De Felice cited "relatively low user engagement" with Video Checkup for its retirement, which has not been previously reported.

Facebook has begun reviewing data deals with app developers and the four big US wireless carriers recently stopped selling data on customers' real-time locations to marketers and other firms.

Walking tightrope

Internet companies now walk a tightrope in trying to generate revenue or improve their services by supplying user data to other companies because they risk compromising – or appearing to compromise – data privacy. And companies including Google and Facebook have curtailed access to data by outside companies over the past two years.

Google's Mobile Network Insights service was not the only source of detailed customer data used by carriers to determine where cell tower upgrades are needed, but it was useful because of the sheer volume of Android phones in the market.

It was an "independent reference from the horse's mouth, so you couldn't get any better than this," said Mushil Mustafa, a former employee at Dubai-based carrier du. "But the carriers have investment in other tools, obviously."

Facebook offers a similar service, called Actionable Insights. Facebook appears committed to continuing the service but declined to comment when asked.

Data-sharing arrangements between tech companies became common over the past decade as the use of smartphones and apps exploded, but what data is collected and how it is shared is not always clear to users.

Companies often are not explicit about their data sharing. Google's data policy that Android users agree to states that it may collect and share network connection quality information. Wireless carriers had not been specifically mentioned as recipients.

As users demand greater transparency, what constitutes a violation of consumer trust is not clear.

Facebook's Actionable Insights service for carriers also includes information about users' gender, age and other characteristics collected from its apps, which helps carriers spot demographic trends to target their marketing, but it does not tie data to specific individuals.

"We have publicly announced this program and carefully designed it to protect people's privacy," said Facebook spokesman Joe Osborne, in a statement.

Google said it shared neither aggregated nor individualized data on user demographics and app usage. The company rejected requests to give equipment vendors any data, it said.

Cross Network Play Hot Drops Into PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS on Console - Olean Times Herald

Cross Network Play Hot Drops Into PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS on Console  Olean Times Herald

SANTA MONICA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug 19, 2019--. PUBG Corporation today announced that cross network play is being added to ...



Cross Network Play Hot Drops Into PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS on Console  Olean Times Herald

SANTA MONICA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug 19, 2019--. PUBG Corporation today announced that cross network play is being added to ...